Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Participatory flood modelling for negotiation and planning in urban informal settlements
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies. Kounkuey Design Initiat, Stockholm, Sweden..ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8614-3787
Kounkuey Design Initiat, Nairobi, Kenya.;UCL, Ctr Urban Sustainabil & Resilience, London, England..
BuroHappold Engn, Water, Bath, Avon, England..
BuroHappold Engn, Water, Bath, Avon, England..
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Bridge Engineering, ISSN 1478-4629, E-ISSN 1751-7680, Vol. 172, no 7, p. 354-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Participatory modelling in water resource management - involving diverse actors in what is traditionally a purely analytical process - is thought to broaden stakeholder engagement and improve outcomes. Further research and case studies are required to explore the practicalities of integrating meaningful participation within modelling processes in the water sector. Participatory modelling may be of particular interest within the context of urban informal areas, where the confluence of climate change, urbanisation and contested land requires new methods for engagement and planning. This paper develops new case-based knowledge to inform the application of participatory modelling and planning for informal urban areas. A flood-modelling project in the large informal neighbourhood of Kibera in central Nairobi, Kenya, is analysed using a newly established framework for the classification of participatory modelling approaches developed by Basco-Carrera et al. in 2017. Conclusions suggest that the further upstream more diverse stakeholders can be involved, the better the chance of co-producing new knowledge and of creating implementable plans and policies. At the same time, delivering 'co-design' of modelling processes in areas of limited co-operation requires a strong vision for participation, a tolerance for contention, a willingness to learn between actors and a budget to support additional time inputs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ICE PUBLISHING , 2019. Vol. 172, no 7, p. 354-371
Keywords [en]
design methods & aids, floods & floodworks, river engineering
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261324DOI: 10.1680/jensu.17.00020ISI: 000485796600005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85072216768OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-261324DiVA, id: diva2:1358283
Note

QC 20191007

Available from: 2019-10-07 Created: 2019-10-07 Last updated: 2019-10-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Mulligan, Joe

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mulligan, Joe
By organisation
Strategic Sustainability Studies
In the same journal
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Bridge Engineering
Civil Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf