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Turning Livelihoods to Rubbish?: A Documentary Film About the Political Ecology of Urban Waste Management in Cape Town and South Africa
Substance Films, Cape Town, South Africa.
The University of Manchester.
Philosophy and History, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science, Technology and Environment. The University of Manchester. (The Situated Ecologies Platform)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6415-4821
2019 (English)Artistic output (Unrefereed)
Resource type
Moving image
Physical description [en]

Digital. MP4 file. Link: http://www.situatedupe.net/tlr/turning-livelihoods-to-rubbish/ 

Description [en]

By following the geography and people of the value-chain of recycling in Cape Town, South Africa, we gain an appreciation of how this formal-to-informal economy operates and functions. We learn about the small profit margins at various points in the chain, the influence of global prices, and how a great part of the economic value produced is carried on the backs and labour of informal recyclers that have very meager outcomes. Experts from the City of Cape Town, from regional universiites and organsations add their knoweldge, statistics and perspcetives. Interviews with industrialists to informal waste recyclers also inform the account. The film is useful for activists, NGOs, government agencies, and teachers to appreciate the challenges in extracting economic value out of waste for different actors, people and subject-positions and how this troubles and relates to government policies of increasing the number of jobs in the South African recycling sector. The film has been used in education and to facilitate meetings between NGOs and government agencies in South Africa.

Abstract [en]

By following the geography and people of the value-chain of recycling in Cape Town, South Africa, we gain an appreciation of how this formal-to-informal economy operates and functions. We learn about the small profit margins at various points in the chain, the influence of global prices, and how a great part of the economic value produced is carried on the backs and labour of informal recyclers that have very meager outcomes. Experts from the City of Cape Town, from regional universiites and organsations add their knoweldge, statistics and perspcetives. Interviews with industrialists to informal waste recyclers also inform the account. The film is useful for activists, NGOs, government agencies, and teachers to appreciate the challenges in extracting economic value out of waste for different actors, people and subject-positions and how this troubles and relates to government policies of increasing the number of jobs in the South African recycling sector. The film has been used in education and to facilitate meetings between NGOs and government agencies in South Africa.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Cape Town and Manchester: The Situated Urban Political Ecologies Collective (SUPE) , 2019.
Publication channel
Vimeo via http://www.situatedupe.net/tlr/turning-livelihoods-to-rubbish/
Keywords [en]
waste, value, consumption, poverty, labour, urbanisation
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
History of Science, Technology and Environment
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-261685OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-261685DiVA, id: diva2:1359737
Projects
Turning Livelihoods to Rubbish funded by UK's ESRC-DFID Poverty Alleviation Fund
Note

QC 20191113

Available from: 2019-10-10 Created: 2019-10-10 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf