Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
The evolution of national urban systems in China, Nigeria and India
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Urban and Regional Studies.
Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Spatial Econ, De Boelelaan 1105, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Jheronimus Acad Data Sci, Sint Janssingel 92, NL-5211 DA 's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands.;Adam Mickiewicz Univ, Ul Bogumila Krygowskiego 10, PL-61680 Poznan, Poland..
2019 (English)In: JOURNAL OF URBAN MANAGEMENT, ISSN 2226-5856, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 408-419Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As a country transitions from a lower order of development to a higher order of development, it undergoes a structural transformation. Accordingly, the spatial economy transforms from a system organized around smaller economic units distributed throughout the countryside, to one comprising larger economic units concentrated in dense urban areas. While historically this process unfolded at a rather gradual pace, it is now being redefined by the unprecedented pace and scale of the contemporary urban narrative. This has presented new patterns of urbanization. Utilizing comparable datasets for China, Nigeria and India this paper examines the evolution of national urban systems under conditions of rapid urbanization. In doing so, it scrutinizes three key dynamics: the spatial distribution of cities, the rate of growth by city size class and the size hierarchy of cities. The results are compared to see if uniform patterns emerge. The findings of this paper suggest a certain degree of heterogeneity among national urban systems; and in some instances contrasting patterns can be observed. We thus caution against a 'one size fits all' approach to interpreting the urban transition in developing countries. The findings of this paper have implications for both theory and policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER , 2019. Vol. 8, no 3, p. 408-419
Keywords [en]
National urban systems, Developing countries, Spatial Lorenz curve, Urban growth rate, Rank size distribution
National Category
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-266003DOI: 10.1016/j.jum.2019.03.003ISI: 000500530600009Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85075615069OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-266003DiVA, id: diva2:1381102
Note

QC 20191220

Available from: 2019-12-20 Created: 2019-12-20 Last updated: 2020-01-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Farrell, Kyle

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Farrell, Kyle
By organisation
Urban and Regional Studies
Social and Economic Geography

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 1 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf