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Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions During Ferromolybdenum Production
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4990-3580
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1919-9964
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Materials Science and Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1360-5765
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2020 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Metallurgy, ISSN 2199-3823, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Molybdenum is mainly used as an alloy material in the iron and steel industry and typically in the form of ferromolybdenum (FeMo). The current study aims to evaluate the energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) of four ferromolybdenum production cases using inventory inputs from a process model based on mass and energy conservations. The total energy required for producing 1 tonne of FeMo can vary between 29.1 GJ/t FeMo and 188.6 GJ/t FeMo. Furthermore, the corresponding GHG emissions differ from 3.16 tCO2-eq/t FeMo to 14.79 tCO2-eq/t FeMo. The main variances are from the mining and beneficiation stages. The differences in these stages come from the beneficiation degree (ore grade) and the mine type (i.e., co-product from copper mining). Furthermore, the mine type has a larger impact on the total energy consumption and GHG emissions than the beneficiation degree. More specifically, FeMo produced as co-product from copper mining has a lower environmental impact measured as the energy consumption and GHG emission among all the four cases. The inventory, consumed energy or associated GHG emission is independent on the initial ore grade and mine type in the downstream production stages such as roasting and smelting. Also, transport has the least impact on the energy consumption and GHG emission among all production stages.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020. Vol. 6, no 1, p. 103-112
Keywords [en]
Energy balance, Energy consumption, Ferromolybdenum, Greenhouse gas emission, Material balance
National Category
Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-267853DOI: 10.1007/s40831-019-00260-8ISI: 000519466700008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85077556115OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-267853DiVA, id: diva2:1411256
Note

QC 20200303

Available from: 2020-03-03 Created: 2020-03-03 Last updated: 2020-05-29Bibliographically approved

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Wei, WenjingSamuelsson, PeterTilliander, AndersGyllenram, RutgerJönsson, Pär G.

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