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Exploring everyday mobility in a living lab based on economic interventions
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Sustainable development, Environmental science and Engineering, Strategic Sustainability Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7466-1448
2020 (English)In: European Transport Research Review, ISSN 1867-0717, E-ISSN 1866-8887, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

New mobility solutions, such as Mobility as a Service, have been suggested to have the potential to reduce car ownership and be part of a transition towards a more sustainable transportation system. However, research suggests that governance measures such as taxation and policies will be needed to ensure sustainability aspects. This paper explores everyday mobility by use of interventions in people’s everyday lives. The focus is on identifying underlying factors that may motivate or hinder changes that are positive from a sustainability perspective. This is then put in the perspective of new mobility services and policy making. Our findings support the view that privately owned cars are hard to replace with new mobility services that contribute to sustainability and are not based on individual cars. Economic interventions for increased sustainability will likely have limited effects, since the alternatives do not offer what car owners value most. Also, limited understanding of the car’s full costs may make the new services appear comparatively more expensive. Furthermore, urban planning to reduce the need for travel, and the capacity of the physical public transport infrastructure will continue to be important. Long vacation trips and “medium sized flows” are identified as opportunities for further research and for new solutions to support sustainable mobility transitions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020. Vol. 12, no 1, article id 5
Keywords [en]
Environment, Mobility as a service, Smart mobility, Sustainability, Travel, TravelVU
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-267771DOI: 10.1186/s12544-019-0392-2ISI: 000511734900001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85078148216OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-267771DiVA, id: diva2:1411417
Note

QC 20200303

Available from: 2020-03-03 Created: 2020-03-03 Last updated: 2020-03-03Bibliographically approved

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Sjöman, MartinRingenson, TinaKramers, Anna H.

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