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Allestädes närvarande kunskap: webbplatser som informativt stöd
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Computer and Systems Sciences, DSV.
2005 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH , 2005. , x, 85 p.
Series
Trita-NA, ISSN 0348-2952 ; 2005:43
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-539ISBN: 91-7178-228-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-539DiVA: diva2:14351
Public defence
2005-12-13, Sal F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2005-01-06 Created: 2005-01-06 Last updated: 2010-08-30Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Ubiquitous e-learning: a concept of virtual knowledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ubiquitous e-learning: a concept of virtual knowledge
2002 (English)In: Web-based Learning: Men & Machines / [ed] Kwan R; Jia W; Chan J; Fong A; Cheung R, 2002, 115-122 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

When attempting to communicate experiences and knowledge between people over distances in time and space we can use the abilities of information technology. With an increase in access to information resources, teaching aids and information facilities, the user can postpone learning to a moment when knowledge is needed. Learning can occur simultaneously with knowledge being used. Sometimes learning even becomes superfluous as it is replaced by technology. A problem that usually needs some specific knowledge to be solved can be solved with support from an information resource, as a kind of knowledge-on-loan. This is nothing new, a textbook can provide knowledge-on-loan. But one gets something qualitative different when one constantly can access information - one cannot walk around with a library. The user can exceed his ability to solve certain tasks in a way that is comparable to a person with such knowledge. To an observer it might look as if the user has the knowledge, here called virtual knowledge. The borderline between information and the users knowledge tends to be vague, and in many cases dependent of the viewpoint. This article will put some light on these questions and is intended to mark out a direction for further research.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24246 (URN)000229421700010 ()981-238-126-0 (ISBN)
Conference
1st International Conference on Web-Based Learning in China (ICWL 2002) Hong Kong, PEOPLES R CHINA, AUG 17-19, 2002
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2010-08-30Bibliographically approved
2. Person Plus Web: Samples From Everyday Life
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Person Plus Web: Samples From Everyday Life
2003 (English)In: Proceedings of World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2003, 2003, 1479-1482 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In everyday life it is often the result of knowledge that counts, not the actual knowledge itself. There are a lot of theories of how artefacts in one way or another can support human thinking and knowing. Intelligent tools can work as a supporting environment in a similar way that Vygotsky puts forward the Zone of proximal development. This study tries to find some empirical signs of how students use the web with consideration to such theories. Ten students put notes about their web use in a diary and were finally interviewed. The web is a natural part of their life. The result shows that the students use the web 1) as an external memory 2) as a reference and "thought prop" and 3) as a source of inspiration and guidance. A conclusion is that educational systems with traditional views of knowledge should look for opportunities many students already know.

Keyword
Students, Educational Technology
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24247 (URN)
Conference
World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (ELEARN) 2003 Phoenix, Arizona, USA, 2003
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2010-08-30Bibliographically approved
3. Why Do Students Use the Web: What Affordances Are Experienced?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Do Students Use the Web: What Affordances Are Experienced?
2003 (English)In: Advances in Technology-based Education: Towards a Knowledge-based Society, 2003, 288-292 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24248 (URN)
Conference
The II International Conference on Multimedia and Information & Communication Technologies in Education, Badajoz, Spain, 3-6 Dec. 2003
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2010-08-30Bibliographically approved
4. Frekventa användares bruk och uppfattning av webben
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Frekventa användares bruk och uppfattning av webben
2005 (Swedish)In: Human IT, ISSN 1402-1501, E-ISSN 1402-151X, Vol. 8, no 1, 1-49 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Web is becoming an essential appliance for people in contemporary society. But although the Web is easy to define in technical terms, it is much harder to describe in terms of aims and what it can afford. This paper presents a study on frequent users' usage and experiences of the Web and is based on a social constructive perspective. Notes from diaries were used in so-called stimulated recall interviews. The study was conducted with inspiration from phenomenography and resulted in the identification of four aspects of what the Web can afford: the aspect of reference; the aspect of distance eliminator; the aspect of overview; and the social aspect. The results also give a picture of usage in everyday life. The respondents' knowledge of how to use the Web is diverse, which implies that such knowledge should not be neglected or taken for granted. Another conclusion is that a technologically deterministic view of Web usage can be questioned.

National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24249 (URN)
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
5. Producer studies: informative web sites from the inside
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Producer studies: informative web sites from the inside
2004 (English)In: Proceedings of Interactive Computer Aided Learning (ICL), 2004, 1-12 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

An emerging genre of web sites can be described with the following characteristics: asubject is well defined; the subject is well covered; a publicist takes responsibility forwhat is published; and the publicist has a certain authority within the field of the subject.Such sites can function as teaching tools or as substitutes for the user’s knowledge.In the long run, the user will know more about the subject, i.e. the site supportslifelong learning and learning on-demand. These sites seem to have an informative"mission" and are run by public authorities, corporations or other organizations.Subjects can be medical care, health, tourism, sports etc. This paper presents a studyof how producers work and experience their production of informative content. Theinterviews were conducted in 2004 with people employed at Swedish sites.

Keyword
Web sites, informal learning, knowledge portal, content provider, informative task, producer, commercial and authorities
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24250 (URN)
Conference
Interactive Computer Aided Learning (ICL), Villach, Austria 2004
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2010-08-30Bibliographically approved
6. Meeting the users need for knowledge: a concept of a learning domain
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Meeting the users need for knowledge: a concept of a learning domain
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24251 (URN)
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2010-08-30Bibliographically approved
7. A Component-based Framework for Description and Management of Learning Objects
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Component-based Framework for Description and Management of Learning Objects
1999 (English)In: Proceedings of WebNet World Conference on the WWW and Internet 1999, 1999, 1424-1425 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The growth of the Internet and the World Wide Web is transforming teaching and learning at all levels of education in the workplace and at home [IMS]. The information pieces or resources for purposes of learning and education construct a new type of web resources. This new kind of web resources with quite distinct features is evolving on the Internet, called Learning Domain. An important characteristic of these resources (asynchronous systems) is that it can be used as a teaching medium as well as a source of knowledge about a subject area [MBA1, MBA2]. Two major parts, closely related to a learning domain, are learning resource providers and consumers. The information providers supply learning resources and the information consumers use the learning resources. Usually, learning information, such as courses, is stored and managed in an information system or a local web site. The supplier may give a sort of description of the structure of the information. This description is termed as metadata. A means for the information suppliers to describe metadata is called metadata model. From the point of view of the resource consumers, they expect to easily find the exact learning knowledge they need. The requirements and goals express what sort of learning materials they are seeking. The consumers may also provide their profiles as support. Indeed, profiles are sometime quite helpful. However, these requirements and goals can be vague, ambiguous, and even in conflicts. The profiles provided by the end users are very likely incomplete and bias-prone. In the next section, we describe several concepts used in the paper. In section 3, we propose a metadata model for learning objects through defining possible components within a learning domain. Then in section 4, we discuss an implementation issue for learning system based on a metadata tool. In the final section we conclude the paper with some discussions of our future work.

Keyword
learning objects
National Category
Media and Communications
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24252 (URN)
Conference
WebNet World Conference on the WWW and Internet (WEBNET) 1999, Honolulu, Hawaii
Note
QC 20100830Available from: 2010-08-30 Created: 2010-08-30 Last updated: 2010-08-30Bibliographically approved

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