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Moral responsibility in traffic safety and public health
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy.
2005 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH , 2005. , viii, 14 p.
Keyword [en]
moral responsibility, responsibility ascriptions, traffic safety, public health, pateranlism, privacy, road traffic suicides
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-609ISBN: 91-7178-226-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-609DiVA: diva2:14601
Note
QC 20101216Available from: 2006-02-07 Created: 2006-02-07 Last updated: 2010-12-16Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Ethical challenges for traffic safety policy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethical challenges for traffic safety policy
(English)Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-27630 (URN)
Note
QS 20120328Available from: 2010-12-16 Created: 2010-12-16 Last updated: 2012-03-28Bibliographically approved
2. Responsibility Ascriptions and Vision Zero
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responsibility Ascriptions and Vision Zero
2006 (English)In: Accident Analysis and Prevention, ISSN 0001-4575, E-ISSN 1879-2057, Vol. 38, no 6, 1113-1118 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vision Zero is a traffic safety policy that was adopted by the Swedish Parliament in 1997. Similar policies have been adopted in Norway and Denmark. In essence, Vision Zero states that it is unacceptable for anyone to die while using the road transport system. The policy also introduces an explicit distribution of responsibility for traffic safety, in which the system designers are ultimately responsible. In this article, it is argued that the proposed new distribution of responsibility can be better understood if we distinguish between two general types of responsibility ascriptions, namely backward-looking and forward-looking responsibility ascriptions. Both types include some kind of causal responsibility and whereas backward-looking responsibility implies an element of blame, forward-looking responsibility implies potential blame, meaning that in cases where the agent who was ascribed responsibility did not achieve the expected result, we are likely to blame her. Vision Zero still ascribes backward-looking responsibility and to some degree forward-looking responsibility to individuals, but adds the explicit forward-looking responsibility of the system designers.

Keyword
responsibility, Vision Zero, traffic safety, ethics
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-8116 (URN)10.1016/j.aap.2006.04.020 (DOI)000241854300011 ()2-s2.0-33749063854 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20100831Available from: 2008-03-18 Created: 2008-03-18 Last updated: 2010-12-16Bibliographically approved
3. Responsibility Ascriptions and Public Health Problems: Who is responsible for obesity and lung cancer?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responsibility Ascriptions and Public Health Problems: Who is responsible for obesity and lung cancer?
2006 (English)In: Journal of Public Health, ISSN 0943-1853, E-ISSN 1613-2238, Vol. 14, no 1, 15-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Discussions about who is responsible for public health problems such as obesity and smoking-related diseases are often heated. A central question concerns the extent to which individuals are responsible for the consequences of their health-impairing behaviour and whether the State and the food and tobacco industries can justifiably be said to be responsible, too. The controversy may be partly due to the two aims of responsibility ascriptions: that they should be morally justified and that they should be efficient. The primary aim of this article is to achieve more clarity in the analysis of this issue. The method used in the article is conceptual analysis in the tradition of moral philosophy. There are two major perspectives on responsibility ascriptions. First, there is the merit-based idea that responsibility should be ascribed to someone who deserves to be held accountable, e.g. because he or she voluntarily and knowingly brought about his or her own health impairment. Second, there is the consequentialist view that responsibility should be ascribed in ways that have as good effects as possible. There are two values at stake here: responsibility ascriptions in public health should satisfy criteria of moral norms or fairness as well as of efficiency. It is argued that both perspectives should be taken into account in public health policymaking. It is concluded that it is important to be aware of the two views of responsibility ascriptions in public health discussions and the policy-making process and to aim at striking a balance between the two.

Keyword
Consequentialism, Ethics, Libertarianism, Responsibility
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-8117 (URN)10.1007/s10389-005-0004-6 (DOI)2-s2.0-33645369951 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20100831Available from: 2008-03-18 Created: 2008-03-18 Last updated: 2010-12-16Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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