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Synchronization Effects in Networks of Striatal Fast Spiking Interneurons - Role of Gap Junctions
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC).
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Computational Biology, CB.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0550-0739
2008 (English)In: ADVANCES IN COGNITIVE NEURODYNAMICS, PROCEEDINGS / [ed] Wang R, Gu F, Shen E, TOTOWA: HUMANA PRESS INC , 2008, 63-66 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent studies have found gap junctions between striatal fast spiking interneurons (FSN). Gap junctions between neocortical FSNs cause increased synchrony of firing in response to current injection, but the effect of gap junctions in response to synaptic input is unknown. To explore this issue, we built a network model of FSNs. Each FSN connects to 30-40% of its neighbours, as found experimentally, and each FSN in the network is activated by simulated up-state synaptic inputs. Simulation experiments show that the proportion of synchronous spikes in coupled FSNs increases with gap junction conductance. Proximal gap junctions increase the synchronization more than distal gap junctions. During up-states the synchronization effects in FSNs coupled pairwise with proximal gap junctions are small for experimentally estimated gap junction conductances; however, higher order correlations are significantly increased in larger FSN networks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TOTOWA: HUMANA PRESS INC , 2008. 63-66 p.
Series
ADVANCES IN COGNITIVE NEURODYNAMICS, PROCEEDINGS
Keyword [en]
Fast spiking interneurons, gap junctions, synchronization, striatum, computational modeling
National Category
Computer Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-14149DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4020-8387-7_13ISI: 000262360700013ISBN: 978-1-4020-8386-0 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-14149DiVA: diva2:330825
Conference
1st International Conference on Cognitive Neurodynamics Shanghai, PEOPLES R CHINA, NOV 17-21, 2007
Note
QC 20100720Available from: 2010-07-20 Created: 2010-07-20 Last updated: 2011-03-21Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Computer Modelling of Neuronal Interactions in the Striatum
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Computer Modelling of Neuronal Interactions in the Striatum
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Large parts of the cortex and the thalamus project into the striatum,which serves as the input stage of the basal ganglia. Information isintegrated in the striatal neural network and then passed on, via themedium spiny (MS) projection neurons, to the output stages of thebasal ganglia. In addition to the MS neurons there are also severaltypes of interneurons in the striatum, such as the fast spiking (FS)interneurons. I focused my research on the FS neurons, which formstrong inhibitory synapses onto the MS neurons. These striatal FSneurons are sparsely connected by electrical synapses (gap junctions),which are commonly presumed to synchronise their activity.Computational modelling with the GENESIS simulator was used toinvestigate the effect of gap junctions on a network of synapticallydriven striatal FS neurons. The simulations predicted a reduction infiring frequency dependent on the correlation between synaptic inputsto the neighbouring neurons, but only a slight synchronisation. Thegap junction effects on modelled FS neurons showing sub-thresholdoscillations and stuttering behaviour confirm these results andfurther indicate that hyperpolarising inputs might regulate the onsetof stuttering.The interactions between MS and FS neurons were investigated byincluding a computer model of the MS neuron. The hypothesis was thatdistal GABAergic input would lower the amplitude of back propagatingaction potentials, thereby reducing the calcium influx in thedendrites. The model verified this and further predicted that proximalGABAergic input controls spike timing, but not the amplitude ofdendritic calcium influx after initiation.Connecting models of neurons written in different simulators intonetworks raised technical problems which were resolved by integratingthe simulators within the MUSIC framework. This thesis discusses theissues encountered by using this implementation and gives instructionsfor modifying MOOSE scripts to use MUSIC and provides guidelines forachieving compatibility between MUSIC and other simulators.This work sheds light on the interactions between striatal FS and MSneurons. The quantitative results presented could be used to developa large scale striatal network model in the future, which would beapplicable to both the healthy and pathological striatum.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH, 2009. 79 p.
Series
Trita-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2009:08
Keyword
striatum, fast spiking interneurons, medium spiny projection neurons, gap junctions, interoperability, MUSIC
National Category
Computer Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-10523 (URN)978-91-7415-331-6 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-06-11, Svedbergssalen (FD5), Roslagstullsbacken 21, Alba Nova, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20100720Available from: 2009-06-03 Created: 2009-05-20 Last updated: 2010-07-20Bibliographically approved

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Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

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