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Assessment of isotopically exchangeable Al in soil materials using Al-26 tracer
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Geochemistry and Ecotechnology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8771-7941
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2005 (English)In: Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, ISSN 0016-7037, E-ISSN 1872-9533, Vol. 69, no 22, 5263-5277 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The solubility of aluminium (Al) in many acidic soils is controlled by complexation reactions with soil organic matter. In such soils, Al solubility is theoretically a function of the pool size of active Al, i.e., the total amount of Al that equilibrates with the sod solution within a defined period of time. To date, no reliable measurements of active Al in soil materials exist. In this study, we determined the isotopically exchangeable pool of Al (E-A1) as an operationally defined assessment of active Al in acidic mineral soils. The suitability of CuCl2 and pyrophosphate (Na4P2O7) as extractants for active Al was also evaluated. Eleven samples, mostly from spodic B horizons, were spiked with carrier-free Al-26 and equilibrated for different time periods (1-756 h). The size of the Al pool with which the Al-26 tracer exchanged increased with time during the whole experimental period. Thus, contact time between solid and solution phases needs to be defined when assessing the active Al pool. Values of E-A1 obtained after I to 5 d of equilibration were equal to the amount of CuCl2 extractable Al, but considerably smaller than the Na4P2O7-extractable pool. Equilibration times greater than 5 d resulted in CuCl2 extractable Al concentrations that under-estimated the active Al pool. Three of the investigated samples were rich in imogolite-type materials (ITM). In these samples, 30-50 % of the added Al-26 rapidly became associated with soil constituents in forms that could not be extracted by Na4P2O7, indicating that a part of ITM may be in a dynamic state.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 69, no 22, 5263-5277 p.
Keyword [en]
accelerator mass-spectrometry, aluminum solubility mechanisms, quickly reacting aluminum, podzol bs horizon, organic-matter, humic substances, forest soils, equilibrium-model, aqueous-solution, acid soils
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-15303DOI: 10.1016/j.gca.2005.06.010ISI: 000234417400007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-29444444890OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-15303DiVA: diva2:333344
Note
QC 20100525Available from: 2010-08-05 Created: 2010-08-05 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved

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