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Vision Zero - Is it irrational?
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), History of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0071-3919
2007 (English)In: Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, ISSN 0965-8564, Vol. 41, no 6, 559-567 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vision Zero, the Swedish road safety policy goal, states that in the long run, no person should be killed or seriously injured as a consequence of road traffic. Since its adoption in 1997, the goal has been seriously criticised. In 2007, performance of the first interim target will be evaluated and a new interim target will be set. In this paper, we summarise the experiences from working with the goal and analyse the criticism that has been put forward against it. The most common criticism is that Vision Zero is an irrational goal. In order to evaluate this criticism, we compare Vision Zero with an independently developed list of adequacy criteria for rational goal-setting. We conclude that according to these criteria, Vision Zero is not irrational.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 41, no 6, 559-567 p.
Keyword [en]
Vision Zero, traffic accidents, rationality, precision, evaluability
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-16569DOI: 10.1016/j.tra.2006.11.002ISI: 000245864100006Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-33847698260OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-16569DiVA: diva2:334611
Note
QC 20100525Available from: 2010-08-05 Created: 2010-08-05 Last updated: 2011-01-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Goal-Setting and the Logic of Transport Policy Decisions
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Goal-Setting and the Logic of Transport Policy Decisions
2009 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The thesis aims at developing approaches to transport policy decisions, based on suggestions and ideas originating from moral philosophy and philosophical decision theory.Paper I analyzes the Swedish transport policy goals, and the problem of combining policygoals with welfare economics. A problem of circularity arises as the Swedish transport policygoals are conflicting, and hence must be subject to trade-offs, while several of the goals themselves entail statements on how to prioritize or restrain goals in case of conflict.Paper II analyzes rationality in road safety policy. Problematic features are identified and discussed. The paper argues that the Swedish road safety goal is rational, since it is actionguiding and achievement-inducing.Paper III includes a model of rational choice under risk with biased risk perception. Under certain plausible conditions, a regulator should raise the population’s risk exposure. By deteriorating the environment the regulator can motivate drivers to choose behaviour that is less biased.Paper IV provides a formal representation of goal systems. The focus is on three properties:consistency, conflict, and coherence. It is argued that consistency is adequately regarded as a property relative to the decision situation or, more specifically, the set of alternatives that the agent faces. Conflict is adequately regarded as a relation over subsets of a given goal systemand should likewise be regarded as relative to the set of alternative that the agent faces.Coherence is given a probabilistic interpretation, based on a support relation over subsets of goal systems.Paper V investigates problems associated with standard deontic logic. A deontic predicate is derived, which avoids some of the major paradoxes in the area. In particular, paradoxes occurring when one obligation is derived by logical necessity from another obligation are dealt with.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH, 2009. vi, 16 p.
Series
Theses in philosophy from the Royal Institute of Technology, ISSN 1650-8831 ; 30
Keyword
goals; transport policy; road safety; coherence; action logic; deontic logic
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-10080 (URN)978-91-9415-252-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2009-03-20, F3, Linstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20100806Available from: 2009-03-12 Created: 2009-03-11 Last updated: 2010-08-06Bibliographically approved
2. Goal-setting and goal-achieving in transport policy
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Goal-setting and goal-achieving in transport policy
2006 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
Abstract [en]

The thesis aims at developing new, alternative approaches and methods based on suggestions and ideas originating from moral philosophy and philosophical decision theory. More precisely, the thesis aims at investigating the rationality of transport policy decisions, including goal-setting and performance evaluation.

Paper I discusses rationality in road safety policy. Problematic features are identified and discussed. The paper argues that the Swedish road safety goal is rational, since it is action-guiding and achievement-inducing. This follows by observing that the goal satisfies the criteria of precision, evaluability, approachability, and motivity. The paper states that previous accusations of irrationality have been unnecessarily imprecise, since no reference is made to independently developed criteria of rational goal-setting.

Paper II discusses the Swedish transport policy goals, and the role of social welfare in rational policy decisions. Goals often come into conflict and trade-offs must be rationally and consistently managed. Policy decisions are outcomes of political processes. In the case of policy goals and decisions, the agent is society. This introduces the problematic concept of social welfare, which itself is an ambiguous goal with many meanings. Whether a decision is rational or not depends on whose perspective one takes on – that of society as a whole or that of the actual decision makers.

Paper III aims at investigating six different procedures for resolving goal conflicts: weighted average, lexicographic preference, conditional lexicographic preference, absolute restriction, generalised prioritarianism, and partial comparability. Criteria for selection, according to the respective procedures, are formulated and summarised in a table. The six procedures are contrasted with respect to their tendency to rule out possible sets of alternatives as being not choiceworthy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH, 2006. vi, 16 p.
Series
Theses in philosophy from the Royal Institute of Technology, ISSN 1650-8831
Keyword
rationality, goals, policy goal, transport policy, road safety, goal conflicts, priority, value uncertainty, restriction
National Category
Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-3995 (URN)91-7178-387-3 (ISBN)
Presentation
2006-06-13, Seminarierummet, avd för filosofi, KTH, Teknikringen 78B, Stockholm, 10:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20101123Available from: 2006-05-24 Created: 2006-05-24 Last updated: 2010-11-23Bibliographically approved

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