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Collision Threshold Pressure Before and After Vocal Loading
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
Hospital Dresden Friedrichstadt.
2009 (English)In: INTERSPEECH 2009: 10th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association 2009, 2009, 764-767 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The phonation threshold pressure (PIP) has been found to increase during vocal fatigue. In the present study we compare PTP and collision threshold pressure (CTP) before and after vocal loading in singer and non-singer voices. Seven subjects repeated the vowel sequence /a,c,i,o,u/ at an SPL of at least 80 dB @ 0.3 m for 20 min. Before and after this loading the subjects' voices were recorded while they produced a diminuendo repeating the syllable /pa/. Oral pressure during the /p/ occlusion was used as a measure of subglottal pressure. Both CTP and PIP increased significantly after the vocal loading.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. 764-767 p.
Keyword [en]
collision threshold pressure, phonation threshold pressure, vocal fatigue, vocal loading
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24332ISI: 000276842800189Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-70450186841ISBN: 978-1-61567-692-7 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-24332DiVA: diva2:346589
Conference
10th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH 2009; Brighton; United Kingdom; 6 September 2009 through 10 September 2009
Note

QC 20100923

Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2014-10-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Alternative Measures of Phonation: Collision Threshold Pressure and Electroglottographic Spectral Tilt: Extra: Perception of Swedish Accents
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alternative Measures of Phonation: Collision Threshold Pressure and Electroglottographic Spectral Tilt: Extra: Perception of Swedish Accents
2010 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The collision threshold pressure (CTP), i.e. the smallest amount of subglottal pressure needed for vocal fold collision, has been explored as a possible complement or alternative to the now commonly used phonation threshold pressure (PTP), i.e. the smallest amount of subglottal pressure needed to initiate and sustain vocal fold oscillation. In addition, the effects of vocal warm-up (Paper 1) and vocal loading (Paper 2) on the CTP and the PTP have been investigated. Results confirm previous findings that PTP increases with an increase in fundamental frequency (F0) of phonation and this is true also for CTP, which on average is about 4 cm H2O higher than the PTP. Statistically significant increases of the CTP and PTP after vocal loading were confirmed and after the vocal warm-up, the threshold pressures were generally lowered although these results were significant only for the females. The vocal loading effect was minor for the two singer subjects who participated in the experiment of Paper 2.

In Paper 3, the now commonly used audio spectral tilt (AST) is measured on the vowels of a large database (5277 sentences) containing speech of one male Swedish actor. Moreover, the new measure electroglottographic spectral tilt (EST) is calculated from the derivatives of the electroglottographic signals (DEGG) of the same database. Both AST and EST were checked for vowel dependency and the results show that while AST is vowel dependent, EST is not.

Paper 4 reports the findings from a perception experiment on Swedish accents performed on 47 Swedish native speakers from the three main parts of Sweden. Speech consisting of one sentence chosen for its prosodically interesting properties and spoken by 72 speakers was played in headphones. The subjects would then try to locate the origin of every speaker on a map of Sweden. Results showed for example that the accents of the capital of Sweden (Stockholm), Gotland and southern Sweden were the ones placed correctly to the highest degree.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH, 2010. 46 p.
Series
Trita-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2010:11
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24335 (URN)978-91-7415-712-3 (ISBN)
Presentation
2010-09-20, Fantum, Lindstedtsvägen 24, Stockholm, 15:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20100915Available from: 2010-09-15 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2010-09-23Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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