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Alternative Measures of Phonation: Collision Threshold Pressure and Electroglottographic Spectral Tilt: Extra: Perception of Swedish Accents
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
2010 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The collision threshold pressure (CTP), i.e. the smallest amount of subglottal pressure needed for vocal fold collision, has been explored as a possible complement or alternative to the now commonly used phonation threshold pressure (PTP), i.e. the smallest amount of subglottal pressure needed to initiate and sustain vocal fold oscillation. In addition, the effects of vocal warm-up (Paper 1) and vocal loading (Paper 2) on the CTP and the PTP have been investigated. Results confirm previous findings that PTP increases with an increase in fundamental frequency (F0) of phonation and this is true also for CTP, which on average is about 4 cm H2O higher than the PTP. Statistically significant increases of the CTP and PTP after vocal loading were confirmed and after the vocal warm-up, the threshold pressures were generally lowered although these results were significant only for the females. The vocal loading effect was minor for the two singer subjects who participated in the experiment of Paper 2.

In Paper 3, the now commonly used audio spectral tilt (AST) is measured on the vowels of a large database (5277 sentences) containing speech of one male Swedish actor. Moreover, the new measure electroglottographic spectral tilt (EST) is calculated from the derivatives of the electroglottographic signals (DEGG) of the same database. Both AST and EST were checked for vowel dependency and the results show that while AST is vowel dependent, EST is not.

Paper 4 reports the findings from a perception experiment on Swedish accents performed on 47 Swedish native speakers from the three main parts of Sweden. Speech consisting of one sentence chosen for its prosodically interesting properties and spoken by 72 speakers was played in headphones. The subjects would then try to locate the origin of every speaker on a map of Sweden. Results showed for example that the accents of the capital of Sweden (Stockholm), Gotland and southern Sweden were the ones placed correctly to the highest degree.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH , 2010. , 46 p.
Series
Trita-CSC-A, ISSN 1653-5723 ; 2010:11
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24335ISBN: 978-91-7415-712-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-24335DiVA: diva2:346593
Presentation
2010-09-20, Fantum, Lindstedtsvägen 24, Stockholm, 15:15 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20100915Available from: 2010-09-15 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2010-09-23Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Vocal fold collision threshold pressure: An alternative to phonation threshold pressure?
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vocal fold collision threshold pressure: An alternative to phonation threshold pressure?
2009 (English)In: Logopedics, Phoniatrics, Vocology, ISSN 1401-5439, Vol. 34, no 4, 210-217 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [et]

Phonation threshold pressure (PTP), frequently used for characterizing vocal fold properties, is often difficult to measure. This investigation analyses the lowest pressure initiating vocal fold collision (CTP). Microphone, electroglottograph (EGG), and oral pressure signals were recorded, before and after vocal warm-up, in 15 amateur singers, repeating the syllable /pa:/ at several fundamental frequencies with gradually decreasing vocal loudness. Subglottal pressure was estimated from oral pressure during the p-occlusion, using the audio and the EGG amplitudes as criteria for PTP and CTP. The coefficient of variation was mostly lower for CTP than for PTP. Both CTP and PTP tended to be higher before than after the warm-up. The results support the conclusion that CTP is a promising parameter in investigations of vocal fold characteristics.

Keyword
Electroglottography, fundamental frequency, phonation threshold, singing, vocal fold contact, vocal warm-up
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics Classical Archaeology and Ancient History
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24331 (URN)10.3109/14015430903382789 (DOI)000273202600009 ()2-s2.0-72049133180 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20100923Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2010-09-23Bibliographically approved
2. Collision Threshold Pressure Before and After Vocal Loading
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Collision Threshold Pressure Before and After Vocal Loading
2009 (English)In: INTERSPEECH 2009: 10th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association 2009, 2009, 764-767 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The phonation threshold pressure (PIP) has been found to increase during vocal fatigue. In the present study we compare PTP and collision threshold pressure (CTP) before and after vocal loading in singer and non-singer voices. Seven subjects repeated the vowel sequence /a,c,i,o,u/ at an SPL of at least 80 dB @ 0.3 m for 20 min. Before and after this loading the subjects' voices were recorded while they produced a diminuendo repeating the syllable /pa/. Oral pressure during the /p/ occlusion was used as a measure of subglottal pressure. Both CTP and PIP increased significantly after the vocal loading.

Keyword
collision threshold pressure, phonation threshold pressure, vocal fatigue, vocal loading
National Category
Fluid Mechanics and Acoustics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24332 (URN)000276842800189 ()2-s2.0-70450186841 (Scopus ID)978-1-61567-692-7 (ISBN)
Conference
10th Annual Conference of the International Speech Communication Association, INTERSPEECH 2009; Brighton; United Kingdom; 6 September 2009 through 10 September 2009
Note

QC 20100923

Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2014-10-08Bibliographically approved
3. Vowel Dependence for Electroglottography and Audio Spectral Tilt
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vowel Dependence for Electroglottography and Audio Spectral Tilt
2010 (English)In: Proceedings of Fonetik, Lund, 2010, 35-39 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: , 2010
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24334 (URN)
Conference
Fonetik
Note
QC 20100923Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2010-09-23Bibliographically approved
4. Recognizing and Modelling Regional Varieties of Swedish
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recognizing and Modelling Regional Varieties of Swedish
Show others...
2008 (English)In: INTERSPEECH 2008: 9TH ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE INTERNATIONAL SPEECH COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATION 2008, 2008, 512-515 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Our recent work within the research project SIMULEKT (Simulating Intonational Varieties of Swedish) includes two approaches. The first involves a pilot perception test, used for detecting tendencies in human clustering of Swedish dialects. 30 Swedish listeners were asked to identify the geographical origin of Swedish native speakers by clicking on a map of Sweden. Results indicate for example that listeners from the south of Sweden are better at recognizing some major Swedish dialects than listeners from the central part of Sweden, which includes the capital area. The second approach concerns a method for modelling intonation using the newly developed SWING (Swedish INtonation Generator) tool, where annotated speech samples are resynthesized with rule based intonation and audiovisually analysed with regards to the major intonational varieties of Swedish. We consider both approaches important in our aim to test and further develop the Swedish prosody model.

Keyword
perception (of Swedish) dialects, prosody modelling, analysis tool, resynthesis
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-24333 (URN)000277026100135 ()2-s2.0-84867224229 (Scopus ID)978-1-61567-378-0 (ISBN)
Conference
9th Annual Conference of the International-Speech-Communication-Association (INTERSPEECH 2008), Brisbane, AUSTRALIA, SEP 22-26, 2008
Note
QC 20100923Available from: 2010-09-01 Created: 2010-09-01 Last updated: 2011-02-23Bibliographically approved

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