Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sanitation Planning: A Tool to Achieve Sustainable Sanitation?
Stockholm Environment Institute.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering.
2007 (English)In: Proceedings of Water Supply and Sanitation For All / [ed] Wilderer et al., 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The global sanitation crisis and its importance to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is reflected in the specific sanitation target adopted in 2002. An enormous amount of funds will need to be invested in sanitation over the coming years in order to meet the MDGs. It is important that these funds are invested in sustainable sanitation systems, since providing sanitation systems that are not sustained is a very costly shortterm solution that may contribute to long-term problems. The authors strongly believe that sanitation planning is one key to sustainable sanitation. Recent planning frameworks for sustainable sanitation systems suggest the utilization of a number of steps: (i) recognizing the existence of different domains across the city, (ii) analysis of the interests driving desire for the sanitation system and services for the stakeholders across the domains, (iii) analysis of external drivers and context that impact behaviour in each domain (iv) analysis of technical options, in relation to findings on context and criteria, (v) analysis of management requirements for proposed technical options, (vi) critical assessment whether the proposed system is fit for the purpose. This paper will discuss the merits and challenges of these planning methodologies in reference to experience from West Africa and Sweden. The intent is to illustrate the potential of these methods for increasing sustainable sanitation, but also to raise some key questions that may be missing from the frameworks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007.
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-26155OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-26155DiVA: diva2:370909
Note
QC 20101118Available from: 2010-11-18 Created: 2010-11-18 Last updated: 2010-11-18Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Assessing sustainable approaches to sanitation planning and implementation in West Africa
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing sustainable approaches to sanitation planning and implementation in West Africa
2008 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other scientific)
Abstract [en]

The challenge of achieving global sanitation targets is that it requires application of both technology that is appropriate and a supporting organizational structure. The interactions between the two begin during the planning/decision-making process and continue throughout the system lifetime. During the last decade, strategic planning frameworks have emerged in the water and sanitation sector that reflect a shift from traditional, top-down planning to a more participatory, bottom-up approach. Despite this shift and in light of the continuing challenge of achieving widespread sanitation in the world, it is necessary to question if a knowledge gap exists between the global sanitation frameworks and local stakeholder priorities. This licentiate thesis presents the first phase of a research project whose objective is to study the global models and compare them with existing local planning and decision-making conditions. It focuses on establishing the global context with regard to strategic planning tools and perspectives on sustainable sanitation. In general, there is close agreement on methodology and processes recommended by international planning frameworks; however the use of the term “sustainable sanitation” is highly variable. In general, the findings of this thesis show that improving sanitation conditions requires tools based on participation, social marketing, and process approaches for planning, capacity development, and feedback. Continuation of this research will investigate the local context regarding current planning practices and perspectives on sustainable sanitation in order to assess potential differences between the global and local context and make recommendations for improving adaptation of planning strategies for bringing sanitation to scale.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH, 2008. viii, 24 p.
Series
Trita-LWR. LIC, ISSN 1650-8629 ; 2043
Keyword
Decision-Making, Implementation, Planning, Sanitation, Sustainable
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-4767 (URN)978-91-7415-022-3 (ISBN)
Presentation
2008-06-09, V3, Teknikringen 72, Stockholm, 13:00
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20101118Available from: 2008-06-03 Created: 2008-06-03 Last updated: 2010-11-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
McConville, Jennifer R.
By organisation
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Civil Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 140 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf