Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Seasonal polyphenism in life history traits: time costs of direct development in a butterfly
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemistry, Organic Chemistry.
Show others and affiliations
2010 (English)In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 64, no 9, 1377-1383 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Insects with two or more generations per year will generally experience different selection regimes depending on the season, and accordingly show seasonal polyphenisms. In butterflies, seasonal polyphenism has been shown with respect to morphology, life history characteristics and behaviour. In temperate bivoltine species, the directly developing generation is more time-constrained than the diapause generation, and this may affect various life history traits such as mating propensity (time from eclosion to mating). Here, we test whether mating propensity differs between generations in Pieris napi, along with several physiological parameters, i.e. male sex pheromone synthesis, and female ovigeny index and fecundity. As predicted, individuals of the directly developing generation-who have shorter time for pupal development-are more immature at eclosion; males take longer to synthesise the male sex pheromone after eclosion and take longer to mate than diapause generation males. Females show the same physiological pattern; the directly developing females lay fewer eggs than diapausing females during the first days of their life. Nevertheless, the directly developing females mate faster after eclosion than diapausing females, indicating substantial adult time stress in this generation and possibly an adaptive value of shortening the pre-reproductive period. Our study highlights how time stress can be predictably different between generations, affecting both life history and behaviour. By analysing several life history traits simultaneously, we adopt a multi-trait approach to examining how adaptations and developmental constraints likely interplay to shape these seasonal polyphenisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 64, no 9, 1377-1383 p.
Keyword [en]
Behavioural polyphenism, Citral, Green-veined white, Phenotypic plasticity, Time constraints, Voltinism
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-26899DOI: 10.1007/s00265-010-0952-xISI: 000280842600002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77955592126OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-26899DiVA: diva2:373086
Note

QC 20101130

Available from: 2010-11-30 Created: 2010-11-29 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Pheromone production in the butterfly Pieris napi L
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pheromone production in the butterfly Pieris napi L
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Aphrodisiac and anti-aphrodisiac pheromone production and composition in the green-veined white butterfly Pieris napi L. were investigated.

Aphrodisiac pheromone biosynthesis had different time constraints in butterflies from the diapausing and directly developing generations.

Effects of stable isotope incorporation in adult butterfly pheromone, in the nectar and flower volatiles of  host plants from labeled substrates were measured by solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry.

A method to fertilize plants with stable isotopes was developed and found to be an effective method to investigate the transfer of pheromone building blocks from flowering plants to butterflies. The anti-aphrodisiac methyl salicylate was not biosynthesized from phenylalanine in flowers of Alliaria petiolata.

Both aphrodisiac and anti-aphrodisiac pheromones in P.napi are produced not only from resources acquired in the larval stage, but also from nutritional resources consumed intheadult stage. Males of P. napi produce the anti-aphrodisiac pheromone from both the essential amino acid L-phenylalanine and from common flower fragrance constituents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. 40 p.
Series
TRITA-CHE-Report, ISSN 1654-1081 ; 2014:8
Keyword
Pieris, Lepidoptera, pheromone, aphrodisiaca, antiaphrodisiaca, biosynthesis, flower volatiles, stable isotopes, incorporation, neral, geranial, methyl salicylate, benzyl cyanide, L - phenylalanine
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-142551 (URN)978-91-7595-036-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-03-26, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, KTH, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20140311

Available from: 2014-03-11 Created: 2014-03-06 Last updated: 2014-03-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Borg-Karlson, Anna-KarinMurtazina, RushanaPalm, Mikael
By organisation
Organic Chemistry
In the same journal
Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Organic Chemistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 47 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf