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Engineering methods applied to a UCAV configuration: some aerodynamic design considerations
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Aerodynamics.
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Aerodynamics.
Consulting Engineering Nangia Aero Research Associates, Clifton, Bristol, UK.
Nielsen Engineering & Research, Inc. Santa Clara, USA.
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(English)In: Journal of Aircraft, ISSN 0021-8669, E-ISSN 1533-3868Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-31398OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-31398DiVA: diva2:403504
Note
QS 20120327Available from: 2011-03-14 Created: 2011-03-14 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Adaptive-fidelity CFD for predicting flying qualities in preliminary aircraft design
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adaptive-fidelity CFD for predicting flying qualities in preliminary aircraft design
2011 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

To reduce development cost and to avoid late design fixes in aircraft design, methods that are fast and economic in estimating the aerodynamic characteristics of complex flight vehicles at the preliminary design stage are desired. This work and thesis focus on the adaptive-fidelity CFD approach, with emphasis on the high end of the CFD tools available today.

The core idea of the method is to use computationally cheap modeling in the part of the flight envelope where it is applicable. When the complexity in the flow field increases more details and realism is included in the mathematical model, at a computationally higher cost. A typical case where this would be required could be at the border of the flight envelope, where flow phenomena such as shocks, flow separation, and interacting vortex systems could occur.

Since the number of cases needed to resolve the flight envelope could be in the order of ten thousands automation is required. The bottlenecks are the discretization of the fluid volume and evaluation of raw CFD data and post processing of the data. These issues are also discussed in this work.

The method has been tested on two real flying aircraft, the X-31 delta-winged aircraft with vector thrust, and the Ranger 2000 Jet trainer, as well as on the SACCON preliminary wing-body UCAV design. The results provide improved understanding of the usefulness of this method as an analysis tool during the preliminary design phase all the way into the flight test diagnostic phase of a new aircraft.

 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2011. x, 23 p.
Series
Trita-AVE, ISSN 1651-7660 ; 2011:07
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-31400 (URN)
Presentation
2011-02-25, Sal H1, KTH, Teknikringen 33, Stockholm, 10:15 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20110314Available from: 2011-03-14 Created: 2011-03-14 Last updated: 2011-03-14Bibliographically approved

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