Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
PAMELA: a payload for antimatter matter exploration and light-nuclei astrophysics - status and first results
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Physics, Particle and Astroparticle Physics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7011-7229
Show others and affiliations
2007 (English)In: 2007 IEEE NUCLEAR SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM CONFERENCE RECORD, VOLS 1-11, 2007, 42-47 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

PAMELA is a satellite-borne experiment designed for precision studies of the charged cosmic radiation. The primary scientific goal is the study of the antimatter component of the cosmic radiation (antiprotons, 80 MeV - 190 GeV; and positrons, 50 MeV - 270 GeV) in order to search for evidence of dark matter particle annihilations. PAMELA will also search for primordial antinuclei (in particular, anti-helium), and test cosmic-ray propagation models through precise measurements of the antiparticle energy spectrum and studies of light nuclei and their isotopes. Concomitant goals include a study of solar physics and solar modulation during the 24th solar minimum by investigating low energy particles in the cosmic radiation; and a reconstruction of the cosmic ray electron energy spectrum up to several TeV thereby allowing a possible contribution from local sources to be studied. PAMELA is housed on-board the Russian Resurs-DK1 satellite, which was launched on June 15th 2006 in an elliptical (350-600 km altitude) orbit with an inclination of 70 degrees. PAMELA consists of a permanent magnet spectrometer, to provide rigidity and charge sign information; a Time-of-Flight and trigger system, for velocity and charge determination; a silicon-tungsten calorimeter, for lepton/hadron discrimination; and a neutron detector. An anticoincidence system is used offline to reject false triggers. In this article the PAMELA experiment and its status are reviewed. A preliminary discussion of data recorded in-orbit is also presented.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. 42-47 p.
Series
IEEE NUCLEAR SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM - CONFERENCE RECORD, ISSN 1082-3654
National Category
Physical Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-46443DOI: 10.1109/NSSMIC.2007.4436285ISI: 000257380400007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-48349085881ISBN: 978-1-4244-0922-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-46443DiVA: diva2:453825
Conference
IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium/Medical Imaging Conference Location: Honolulu, HI Date: OCT 26-NOV 03, 2007
Note
QC 20111103Available from: 2011-11-03 Created: 2011-11-03 Last updated: 2011-11-03Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Pearce, Mark

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pearce, MarkCarlson, PerHofverberg, Petter
By organisation
Particle and Astroparticle Physics
Physical Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 45 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf