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The developement of a down-scaled over-actuated vehicle equipped with autonomous corner module functionality
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Vehicle Dynamics.
Vehicle Dynamics and Active Safety, Volvo Car Corporation, Göteborg, Sverige. (Vehicle Dynamics)
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Vehicle Dynamics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4048-3452
KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Aeronautical and Vehicle Engineering, Vehicle Dynamics.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8928-0368
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2010 (English)In: FISITA Proceedings 2010, paper F2010B056, 2010Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents the development of a functional down-scaled prototype of a passenger car with capability to control steering, wheel torques, wheel loads and camber individually. The adopted chassis technology is based on a modularised platform, referred to as Autonomous corner modules (ACM), which simplifies the re-use of components at the four corners of the vehicle and between different vehicles.

This work gives an insight in the design of the vehicle and the selection of electrical actuators and sensors to provide all ACM functions. Since a part of the implemented chassis components do not admit to be scaled down at the same level, necessary design modifications are suggested. The problems of scaling, meaning that a down-scaled prototype cannot fully emulate a full-scaled vehicle’s all functions simultaneously, are a great disadvantage of down scaling. For example is gravity one desired parameter that is hard to physically scale down.

In order to evaluate the behaviour of the down-scaled prototype, it is of high importance to establish the characteristics of the developed vehicle and its subsystems. In particular, tyre design is considered as complex. For this reason, different ideas of methods to confirm tyre characteristics are proposed.

Also the paper presents the initial process of developing the prototype vehicle that is later to be used in vehicle dynamics research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010.
Keyword [en]
autonomous corner modules, active chassis, down-scaled prototype, over-actuation
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-48917OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-48917DiVA: diva2:458968
Conference
FISITA 2010
Note

QC 20111124

Available from: 2011-11-24 Created: 2011-11-24 Last updated: 2014-11-14Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Exploring force allocation control of over actuated vehicles
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring force allocation control of over actuated vehicles
2011 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

As the concern for environmental changes and diminishing oil resources grows more and more, the trend of new vehicle concepts now includes full electric or partly electric propulsion systems. The introduction of electric power sources enables more advanced motion control systems due to electrification of the vehicle's actuators, such as individual wheel steering and in wheel hub motors. This can enable a control methodology that uses different chassis control strategies into a system that will be able to fully utilise the vehicle. Due to this, future vehicles can be more optimised with respect to energy consumption, performance and active safety.

Force allocation control is a method that distributes the wheel forces to produce the desired response of the vehicle. In order to evaluate if this methodology can be implemented in future series production vehicles, the aim of this work is to explore how force allocation control can be utilised in a real vehicle to improve vehicle dynamics and safety.

In order to evaluate different approaches for generic vehicle motion control by optimization, modelling and simulation in combination with real vehicle experiments will be needed to fully understand the more complex system, especially when actuator dynamics and limitations are considered. The use of a scale prototype vehicle represents a compromise between development cost, efficiency and accuracy, as it allows realistic experiments without the cost and complexity of full vehicle test. Moreover since the vehicle is unmanned it allows studies of at-the-limit situations, without the safety risks in full vehicle experiments.

A small scale prototype vehicle (Hjulia) has been built and equipped with autonomous corner module functionality that enables individual control of all wheels. A cost effective force allocation control approach has been implemented and evaluated on the prototype vehicle, as well as in vehicle simulation. Results show improvement of stopping distance and vehicle stability of a vehicle during split-m braking. The aspects of vehicle dynamic scaling are also discussed and evaluated, as it is important to know how the control implementation of small scale prototype vehicles compares with full size vehicles. It is shown that there is good comparison between vehicles of different scales, if the vertical gravitational acceleration is adjusted for. In Hjulia, gravity compensation is solved by adding a specific lifting rig.

Studies of vehicles considering optimal path tracking and available actuators are also made to evaluate control solutions of evasive manoeuvres at low and high friction surfaces. Results show differences in how the forces are distributed among the wheels, even though the resulting global forces on the vehicle are approximated to be scaled by friction. Also it is shown that actuator limitations are critical in at-the-limit situations, such as an obstacle avoidance manoeuvre. As a consequence these results will provide good insights to what type of control approach to choose to handle a safety critical situation, depending on available actuators.

The built prototype vehicle with implemented force allocation control has shown to be a useful tool to investigate the potential of control approaches, and it will be used for future research in exploring the benefits of force allocation control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2011. viii, 42 p.
Series
Trita-AVE, ISSN 1651-7660 ; 2011:80
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-48969 (URN)
Presentation
2011-12-02, Sal V1, KTH, Teknikringen /2, Stockholm, 10:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20111202Available from: 2011-12-02 Created: 2011-11-24 Last updated: 2011-12-02Bibliographically approved
2. Motion modelling and control strategies of over-actuated vehicles
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Motion modelling and control strategies of over-actuated vehicles
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

With the growing concern for environmental change and uncertain oil resources, the development of new vehicle concepts will in many cases include full or partial electric propulsion. The introduction of more advanced powertrains enables vehicles that can be controlled with a variety of electric actuators, such as wheel hub motors and individual steering. With these actuators, the chassis can be enabled to adjust its properties depending on the driving situation.

Manoeuvring of the vehicle, using for example electric propulsion, braking, suspension, steering and camber control may also allow a variety of combinations which, if properly utilised, can increase the outer limits of vehicle performance and safety. The fact that the vehicle has a greater number of actuators than required to control a certain number of degrees of freedom is called over-actuation. Since there is a great need for energy optimised vehicles, energy efficient control is also required. For this reason, this work is about the allocation of wheel forces can improve safety, performance and energy efficiency in future electrified vehicles in different driving situations.

Studies of optimally controlled vehicles show that performance, safety and efficiency can be improved by utilising available actuators in over-actuated vehicles. Path tracking and optimal actuator control signals are evaluated in evasive manoeuvres at low and high friction surfaces. The results show how the forces are distributed differently among the wheels, even though the resulting global forces on the vehicle are similar. Optimal control of camber angles and active suspension show that vehicle performance and safety can be greatly improved. The limits of tyre forces can be increased and better utilised in a way that a passive system is unable to achieve. Actuator performance is also shown to be important, however even low actuator performance is shown to be sufficient to improve vehicle performance considerably. Energy efficiency is also improved as unnecessary vehicle motions are minimised during normal driving and wheel forces are used in a better way.

Simplified algorithms to control available actuators, such as wheel angles, vertical actuation and propulsion torques, have been developed, based on the analysis of the results of the optimisation studies. Analyses of the impact of these simplifications have been made. For the cases studied, it has been shown that it is possible to get significantly better performance at reasonable levels of actuator performance and control complexity. This helps to simplify the introduction of this technology in electrified vehicles.

Control allocation is a method that distributes the wheel forces to produce the desired response of the vehicle. Simplified control allocation algorithms are proposed that allocate wheel forces in a way that resembles the behaviour of the optimisation solutions. To be able to evaluate the applicability of this methodology for implementation in vehicles, a small-scale prototype vehicle with force allocation control possibilities has been designed and built. The vehicle is equipped with autonomous corner module functionality that enables individual control of all wheels regarding steering, camber, propulsion/braking and vertical loads. Straight-line braking tests show that force allocation can be used in a real vehicle and will enhance performance and stability even at a very basic level, using few sensors with only the actual braking forces as feedback.

In summary, this work has contributed to a better understanding of how the allocation of wheel forces can improve vehicle safety, performance and energy efficiency. Moreover, it has contributed to increased understanding of how vehicle motions should be modelled and simulated, and how control strategies for over-actuated vehicles can be made more suitable for implementation in future electrified vehicles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. x, 44 p.
Series
TRITA-AVE, ISSN 1651-7660 ; 2014:75
National Category
Vehicle Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-155919 (URN)
Public defence
2014-12-03, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, KTH, Stockholm, 09:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
Generic vehicle motion modelling and control for enhanced driving dynamics and energy management
Note

Finansierat av SHC, Swedish Hybrid Vehicle Centre. QC 20141114

Available from: 2014-11-14 Created: 2014-11-14 Last updated: 2014-11-14Bibliographically approved

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Stensson Trigell, AnnikaDrugge, LarsJerrelind, Jenny

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