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Verbal Description of DJ Recordings
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics. (Sound and Music Computing)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4259-484X
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3086-0322
2008 (English)In: Proc. of the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition, Sapporo, 2008, 20- p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In a recent pilot study, DJs were asked to perform the same composition using different intended emotional expression (happiness, sadness etc). In a successive test, these intentions could not be matched by listeners' judgement. One possible explanation is that DJs have a different vocabulary when describing expressivityin their performances. We designed an experiment to understand how DJs and listeners describe the music. The experiment was aimed at identifying a set of descriptors used mainly with scratch music, but possibly also with other genres. In a web questionnaire, subjects were presented with sound stimuli from scratch music recordings. Each participant described the music with words, phrases and terms in a free labelling task. The resulting list of responses was analyzed in several steps and condensed to a set of about 10 labels. Important differences were found between describing scratch music and other Western genres such as pop, jazz or classical music. For instance, labels such as cocky, cool, amusement and skilled were common. These specific labels seem mediated from the characteristic hip-hop culture. The experiment offered some explanation to the problem of verbally describing expressive scratch music. The set of labels found can be used for further experiments, for example when instructing DJs in performances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sapporo, 2008. 20- p.
National Category
Computer Science Human Computer Interaction Psychology Music
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-52078OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-52078DiVA: diva2:465372
Conference
the 10th International Conference on Music Perception and Cognition
Note

tmh_import_11_12_14. QC 20120111. QC 20160115

Available from: 2011-12-14 Created: 2011-12-14 Last updated: 2016-01-15Bibliographically approved

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Hansen, Kjetil FalkenbergBresin, Roberto

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf