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The psychophysiology of James Bond: Phasic emotional responses to violent video game events
Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland.
Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
Center for Knowledge and Innovation Research, Helsinki School of Economics, Helsinki, Finland. .
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2008 (English)In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 8, no 1, 114-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The authors examined emotional valence- and arousal-related phasic psychophysiological responses to different violent events in the first-person shooter video game "James Bond 007: NightFire" among 36 young adults. Event-related changes in zygomaticus major, corrugator supercilii, and orbicularis oculi electromyographic (EMG) activity and skin conductance level (SCL) were recorded, and the participants rated their emotions and the trait psychoticism based on the Psychoticism dimension of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire--Revised, Short Form. Wounding and killing the opponent elicited an increase in SCL and a decrease in zygomatic and orbicularis oculi EMG activity. The decrease in zygomatic and orbicularis oculi activity was less pronounced among high Psychoticism scorers compared with low Psychoticism scorers. The wounding and death of the player's own character (James Bond) elicited an increase in SCL and zygomatic and orbicularis oculi EMG activity and a decrease in corrugator activity. Instead of joy resulting from victory and success, wounding and killing the opponent may elicit high-arousal negative affect (anxiety), with high Psychoticism scorers experiencing less anxiety than low Psychoticism scorers. Although counterintuitive, the wounding and death of the player's own character may increase some aspect of positive emotion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 8, no 1, 114-120 p.
Keyword [en]
aggressive behavior, emotions, facial EMG, skin conductance, video games
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-59700DOI: 10.1037/1528-3542.8.1.114ISI: 000253034600011PubMedID: 18266521OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-59700DiVA: diva2:477349
Available from: 2012-01-13 Created: 2012-01-11 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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