Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
How to "walk the talk": The perspectives of sector staff on implementation of the rural water supply programme in Uganda
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering, Environmental Management and Assessment.
2011 (English)In: Natural resources forum (Print), ISSN 0165-0203, E-ISSN 1477-8947, Vol. 35, no 4, 269-282 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many countries in sub-Saharan Africa have adopted similar approaches to tackle the challenges of rural water supply, including community-based management, community participation and the demand-responsive approach. These are often combined with nationwide programmes of capacity-building and decentralization. This paper first shows how Uganda has adopted these approaches in its rural water supply programme. Based on Government documents, we construct an organizational framework that illustrates the overall programme and outlines the roles and responsibilities which actors are expected to fulfil. Second, based on interviews with sector staff and a review of Government documents, the paper examines challenges to successfully walk the talk; that is, it provides insight into challenges affecting programme implementation. Among numerous difficulties, two key issues are highlighted: local political interference and the weak capacity of local governments. Concerning local political interference, local planning processes need to be reformed so that local politicians commit more strongly to improving water supply. Regarding local government capacity, the Government department responsible for the programme has established eight regional units that provide support to local governments. This promising strategy, combined with more appropriate engagement and the commitment of local politicians, should help to improve the implementation of the rural water supply programme in Uganda.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 35, no 4, 269-282 p.
Keyword [en]
Rural water supply, programme implementation, Uganda, sub-Saharan Africa, community-based management, demand-responsive approach, capacity-building, decentralization
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-63280DOI: 10.1111/j.1477-8947.2011.01401.xISI: 000298084800002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-82255186126OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-63280DiVA: diva2:482696
Note
QC 20120124Available from: 2012-01-24 Created: 2012-01-23 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Information, systems and water management: Information systems which support water management - cases from rural water supply in Uganda and WFD implementation in the North Baltic River Basin District, Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information, systems and water management: Information systems which support water management - cases from rural water supply in Uganda and WFD implementation in the North Baltic River Basin District, Sweden
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Successfulwater management implies tackling multi-level governance and improvingintegration between sectors. Sound information and related processes will berequired to support water management decision-making at these various levels.Additionally, considering Principle 10 of the UN’s Agenda 21, actors shouldhave access to information to enable their involvement in shaping watermanagement outcomes. This thesis draws on the results of two separate caseswhere information systems support action: (i) rural water supply in Uganda;and, (ii) water management according to the Water Framework Directive in Sweden.A research approach was formed based on: (a) a model conceptualising how informationsystems support organisational processes which lead to action; and, (b) asystems-thinking methodology. The results reveal that there are numerous,similar challenges to achieving information support for action in both theUgandan and Swedish cases. In both cases, information quantity and quality islimited; consequentially, the use of information to support action is inhibited.Furthermore, not all actors are involved in information system processes; in particular,local-level actors. Overall, there is limited support of strategic decision-makingand weak support of operational, or local, decision-making. The results suggestthat it might be possible to tailor strategic-level information processes tolocal needs, hopefully encouraging active involvement of local actors. Improvedinvolvement, together with a suitable systems approach, could be used to furtherdevelop information systems, improving integration between multiple levels ofgovernance and across sectors – suiting not just the needs ofstrategic decision-making but also the needs of operational, or local,decision-making.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012. x, 27 p.
Series
Trita-LWR. PHD, ISSN 1650-8602 ; 1067
Keyword
information support, actors, water management, organisational action, Soft Systems Methodology
National Category
Environmental Management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-100885 (URN)978-91-7501-459-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-09-11, KTH, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20120822Available from: 2012-08-22 Created: 2012-08-21 Last updated: 2012-08-22Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Quin, AndrewBalfors, Berit
By organisation
Environmental Management and Assessment
In the same journal
Natural resources forum (Print)
Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 46 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf