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Molecular weight changes and polymeric matrix changes correlated with the formation of degradation products in biodegraded polyethylene
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7790-8987
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Polymer Technology.
1999 (English)In: Journal of environmental polymer degradation, ISSN 1064-7546, E-ISSN 1572-8900, Vol. 64, 91-99 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The molecular weight changes in abiotically and biotically degraded LDPE and LDPE modified with starch and/or prooxidant were compared with the formation of degradation products, The samples were thermooxidized for 6 days at 100 degrees C to initiate degradation and then either inoculated with Arthobacter paraffineus or kept sterile. After 3.5 years homologous series of mono- and dicarboxylic acids and ketoacids were identified by GC-MS in abiotic samples, while complete disappearance of these acids was observed in biotic environments. The molecular weights of the biotically aged samples were slightly higher than the molecular weights of the corresponding abiotically aged samples, which is exemplified by the increase in (M) over bar(n) from 5200 g/mol for a sterile sample with the highest amount of prooxidant to 6000 g/mol for the corresponding biodegraded sample. The higher molecular weight in the biotic environment is explained by the assimilation of carboxylic acids and low molecular weight polyethylene chains by microorganisms. Assimilation of the low molecular weight products is further confirmed by the absence of carboxylic acids in the biotic samples. Fewer carbonyls and more double bonds were seen by FTIR in the biodegraded samples, which is in agreement with the biodegradation mechanism of polyethylene.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1999. Vol. 64, 91-99 p.
Keyword [en]
LDPE, polyethylene, biodegradation, degradation, oxidation, degradation products
National Category
Polymer Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-72641OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-72641DiVA: diva2:487860
Note
NR 20140805Available from: 2012-02-01 Created: 2012-02-01 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Hakkarainen, Minna

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