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Drug-resistant bacteria in hospital wards - the role of ventilation
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1882-3833
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Civil and Architectural Engineering, Fluid and Climate Technology.
2009 (English)In: 9th International Conference and Exhibition - Healthy Buildings 2009, HB 2009, 2009, 596- p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To limit the airborne spread of infectious agents (antibiotic-resistant bacteria) in hospital wards is an increasing world-wide concern. A multi-disciplinary Swedish research team is together with industry focusing on this problem. New knowledge is sought on how building ventilation services should be designed to minimize the risk of airborne infectious agents. In the literature there is strong and sufficient evidence to demonstrate the association between ventilation, air movements in buildings and the transmission/spread of diseases. There is, however, insufficient data to specify and quantify the minimum ventilation requirements in relation to the spread of infectious diseases via the airborne route. The latest developments in the advanced numerical simulation (CFD) methods offer new possibilities to follow the routes of airborne contaminants. Many ventilation parameters, including air flow rates, thermal and pressure conditions as well as the behavior of persons in the room are analyzed. The influence of both local air supply and local air exhaust has been analyzed and very promising results from this part of the work are presented. A bacterium spread from a patient confined to his bed was limited and for certain conditions almost eliminated. Ventilation and spatial parameter combinations to limit and prevent the spread of contaminants are mapped for different hospital wards. The risk of airborne transmission is modeled and discussed. Implementation in practice is sought via close collaboration with industry.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2009. 596- p.
Keyword [en]
Hospital ward, airborne transmission, infectious agents, ventilation control, CFD
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-73605Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84872671099OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-73605DiVA: diva2:489002
Conference
9th International Healthy Buildings Conference and Exhibition, HB 2009; Syracuse, NY; United States; 13 September 2009 through 17 September 2009
Note

Qc 20120206

Available from: 2012-02-06 Created: 2012-02-02 Last updated: 2014-09-23Bibliographically approved

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Holmberg, Sture

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
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  • en-US
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