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Energy Use and Environmental impacts of the Swedish Building and Real Estate Management Sector
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2949-422X
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2011 (English)In: Journal of Industrial Ecology, ISSN 1088-1980, E-ISSN 1530-9290, Vol. 15, no 3, 394-404 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

One of the key features of environmental policy integration in Sweden is sectorresponsibility. The National Board of Housing, Building and Planning is responsible for the building and real estate management sector and should, as a part of this responsibility, assess the environmental impacts of this sector. The aim of this study is to suggest and demonstrate a method for such an assessment. The suggested method is a life cycle assessment, based on an input-output analysis. The method can be used for regular monitoring and for prioritization between different improving measures. For the assessment to sufficiently cover the Swedish Environmental Quality Objectives, complementary information is needed, in particular with respect to the indoor environment. According to the results, the real estate management sector contributes between 10% and 40% of Swedish energy use; use of hazardous chemical products; generation of solid waste; emissions of gases contributing to climate change; and human toxicological impacts, including nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulates. Transport and production of nonrenewable building materials contribute significantly to several of the emissions. Heating of buildings contributes more to energy use than to climate change, due to the use of renewable energy sources. To reduce climate change, measures should therefore prioritize not only heating of buildings but also the important upstream processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 15, no 3, 394-404 p.
Keyword [en]
Construction, Hybrid life cycle assessment, Indoor environment, Industrial ecology, Policy integration, Sector responsibility
National Category
Environmental Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-76184DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-9290.2011.00340.xISI: 000291222200007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-80955180946OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-76184DiVA: diva2:490953
Note
QC 20120207Available from: 2012-02-06 Created: 2012-02-06 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved

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Malmqvist, Tove

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