Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Leadership in workplace health promotion projects: 1- and 2-year effects on long-term work attendance
Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborgs universitet.
2007 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, Vol. 17, no 5, 471-476 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite the acknowledged role of leadership in the psychosocial work environment, few studies focus on how leadership qualities and strategies may act as key processes of importance to positive effects of workplace health promotion (WHP). The aim of this study was to increase knowledge about how leadership qualities and strategies in WHP projects influence employees’ long-term work attendance. Method: The 1- and 2-year effect of leadership on the prevalence of long-term work attendance among municipal human service workers (n = 3 275) was analysed using 3-year register-based data on sick leave, questionnaires and a qualitative categorization of each unit. Result:Increased leadership qualities, especially where leaders used rewards, recognition and respect, were associated with higher prevalence of work attendance at follow-up [PR 1.42 (1.20–1.69)]. Leaders’ strategies and views on work-related health had a significant impact on increased work attendance in projects that had goals clearly focusing on changeable factors [1.36 (1.11–1.67)], in multi-focused projects [1.60 (1.24–2.04)] and in projects aimed to increase employees’ awareness of their health. Workplace health promotion strategies with a single focus on strengthening individual, professional or organizational resources were negatively associated with work attendance. A higher proportion of employee work attendance was also seen in units whose leaders viewed the organization or the society (rather than individual workers) as responsible for the high rate of sick leave. Conclusion: Leadership, WHP strategies and leaders’ attitudes towards employee work-related health have importance for implementation processes, as well as affecting employee work attendance. In this study, multi-focused WHP interventions had the largest effect on work attendance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 17, no 5, 471-476 p.
Keyword [en]
health promotion, management, psychosocial factors, sick leave, work ability
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-77854DOI: 10.1093/eurpub/ckm004ISI: 000250677100014OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-77854DiVA: diva2:492154
Note
QC 20120307Available from: 2012-02-07 Created: 2012-02-07 Last updated: 2012-03-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Dellve, Lotta
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf