Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Modeling the Effect of Variable Cam Phasing on Volumetric Efficiency, Scavenging and Torque Generation
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3672-5316
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Automatic Control. KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Centres, ACCESS Linnaeus Centre.
2010 (English)In: SAE 2010 World Congress & Exhibition, 2010Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In a mean value engine model, the mass flow of air through the cylinders is, up to a constant factor, described as the product of the air density in the intake manifold, the engine speed, and the volumetric efficiency. The volumetric efficiency is traditionally modeled as a function of the engine speed and the pressure in the intake and exhaust manifolds, but for modern engines the model must also account for the effect of variable valve timings. The engine that is modeled here is equipped with variable cam phasing on both the intake and the exhaust valves. In order to reduce the complexity, we will only model the effect of the valve overlap, which is the number of crank angle degrees that both valves are open simultaneously. When the valve overlap is significant, there may be fresh air that flows directly through the exhaust valve, known as scavenging. The scavenging will cause the air/fuel ratio of the gas mixture in the cylinder to be different than the global air/fuel ratio, and it has effects both on the torque generation from the combustion and on the temperature and pressure of the exhaust gases that drive the turbine as well as on the emission levels from the engine. The degree of scavenging cannot be measured directly on the engine and for that part of the modeling we use GT POWER simulations. The simulations show that the scavenging can be modeled as a function of the volumetric efficiency. A torque model is derived as a tool to validate the scavenging model. The new models are shown to improve the predictions of the engine torque significantly.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010.
National Category
Control Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-79932DOI: 10.4271/2010-01-1190Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84877240404OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-79932DiVA: diva2:495868
Conference
SAE 2010 World Congress & Exhibition, April 2010, Detroit, MI, USA
Note
QC 20120418Available from: 2012-02-09 Created: 2012-02-09 Last updated: 2012-04-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Mårtensson, Jonas

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mårtensson, JonasFlärdh, Oscar
By organisation
Automatic ControlACCESS Linnaeus Centre
Control Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 554 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf