Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Integrating DFSS and Lean Product Development: Using Project Management Success Factors to Evaluate Product Development Concepts
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
KTH, School of Electrical Engineering (EES), Industrial Information and Control Systems.
2010 (English)In: Proceedings ASQ World conference on quality and Improvement, 2010Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In product development, there is a need for quality focused structures that enable connections between the development divvision and other departments within the company. During the last decade, several concepts for product development have arisen. Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) and Lean Product Development (LPD) are now the most well known quality focused concepts for product development. Even though DFSS and LPD share the same objectives, they are most often regarded independent from each other and most companies chose to work with only one of the concepts. This paper compares and analyzes DFSS and LPD in order to investigate if and how the concepts could be integrated with each other. A widened scope and an objective evaluation of both concepts are ensured by using a general project management approach. The analysis of DFSS and LPD is based on the fulfillment of the ten project management success factors as provided by the Standish Group in their of the cited Chaos report. Based on the analysis, this study concludes that an integration of DFSS and LPD is both possible and beneficial. Together, they meet the requirements of the success factors to a much larger extent than what would be the case for a single concept. From the perspective of The Standish Group a combination of DFSS and LPD generates an almost perfect and complete concept for product development. This paper presents a proposal of how to integrate DFSS and LPD combining parts from the LPD philosophy with concrete tools and structures from DFSS for maximal success.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010.
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-80774OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-80774DiVA: diva2:496709
Conference
IR-EE-ICS_2010:066
Note
QC 20120329Available from: 2012-02-10 Created: 2012-02-10 Last updated: 2012-03-29Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

https://eeweb01.ee.kth.se/upload/publications/reports/2010/IR-EE-ICS_2010_066.pdf

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ericsson, EvelinaLilliesköld, Joakimvon Würtemberg, Liv Marcks
By organisation
Industrial Information and Control Systems
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 134 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf