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Arsenic uptake by plants and possible phytoremediation applications: A brief overview
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering. (KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2715-2931
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2012 (English)In: Environmental Chemistry Letters, ISSN 1610-3653, E-ISSN 1610-3661, Vol. 10, no 3, 217-224 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This review focuses the behaviour of arsenic in plant-soil and plant-water systems, arsenic-plant cell interactions, phytoremediation, and biosorption. Arsenate and arsenite uptake by plants varies in different environment conditions. An eco-friendly and low-cost method for arsenic removal from soil-water system is phytoremediation, in which living plants are used to remove arsenic from the environment or to render it less toxic. Several factors such as soil redox conditions, arsenic speciation in soils, and the presence of phosphates play a major role. Translocation factor is the important feature for categorising plants for their remediation ability. Phytoremediation techniques often do not take into account the biosorption processes of living plants and plant litter. In biosorption techniques, contaminants can be removed by a biological substrate, as a sorbent, bacteria, fungi, algae, or vascular plants surfaces based on passive binding of arsenic or other contaminants on cell wall surfaces containing special active functional groups. Evaluation of the current literature suggests that understanding molecular level processes, and kinetic aspects in phytoremediation using advanced analytical techniques are essential for designing phytoremediation technologies with improved, predictable remedial success. Hence, more efforts are needed on addressing the molecular level behaviour of arsenic in plants, kinetics of uptake, and transfer of arsenic in plants with flowing waters, remobilisation through decay, possible methylation, and volatilisation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 10, no 3, 217-224 p.
Keyword [en]
Arsenic toxicity, Bioremediation, Biosorption, Translocation, Bioconcentration, Bioaccumulation
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-84261DOI: 10.1007/s10311-011-0349-8ISI: 000307547000002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84865403564OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-84261DiVA: diva2:499342
Note

QC 20120921

Available from: 2012-02-13 Created: 2012-02-13 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY PHYTOFILTRATION AND SILICON TREATMENT: A POTENTIAL SOLUTION FOR LOWERING ARSENIC CONCENTRATIONS IN FOOD CROPS
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ARSENIC REMOVAL BY PHYTOFILTRATION AND SILICON TREATMENT: A POTENTIAL SOLUTION FOR LOWERING ARSENIC CONCENTRATIONS IN FOOD CROPS
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Use of arsenic-rich groundwater for crop irrigation can increase the arsenic (As) content in food crops and act as a carcinogen, compromising human health. Using aquatic plant based phytofiltration is a potential eco-technique for removing arsenic from water. The aquatic moss species Warnstorfia fluitans grows naturally in mining areas in northern Sweden, where high concentrations of arsenic occur in lakes and rivers. This species was selected as a model for field, climate chamber and greenhouse studies on factors governing arsenic removal and arsenic phytofiltration of irrigation water. The arsenic and silicon (Si) concentrations in soil, water and plant samples were measured by AAS (atomic absorption spectrophotometry), while arsenite and arsenate species were determined using AAS combined with high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an anion exchange column. The arsenic content in grains of hybrid and local aromatic rice (Oryza sativa) cultivars with differing arsenic accumulation factor (AF) values was investigated in an arsenic hotspot in Bangladesh. The results showed that arsenic AF was important in identifying arsenic-safer rice cultivars for growing in an arsenic hotspot. The study based on silicon effect on arsenic uptake in lettuce showed that arsenic accumulation in lettuce (Lactuca sativa) could be reduced by silicon addition. The aquatic moss had good phytofiltration capacity, with fast arsenic removal of up to 82% from a medium with low arsenic concentration (1 µM). Extraction analysis showed that inorganic arsenic species were firmly bound inside moss tissue. Absorption of arsenic was relatively higher than adsorption in the moss. Regarding effects of different abiotic factors, plants were stressed at low pH (pH 2.5) and arsenic removal rate was lower from the medium, while arsenic efflux occurred in arsenate-treated medium at low (12°C) and high (30°C) temperature regimes. Besides these factors, low oxygenation increased the efficiency of arsenic removal from the medium. Finally, combining W. fluitans as a phytofilter with a lettuce crop on a constructed wetland significantly reduced the arsenic content in edible parts (leaves) of lettuce. Thus W. fluitans has great potential for use as an arsenic phytofilter in temperate regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
KTH: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017. 49 p.
Series
TRITA-LWR. PHD, ISSN 1650-8602 ; 2017:02
Keyword
aquatic moss, grain, rice, lettuce, macrophyte, phytoremediation, speciation, temperature, oxygenation, wetland.
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Other Environmental Engineering Botany Bio Materials Inorganic Chemistry
Research subject
Land and Water Resources Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-203995 (URN)978-91-7729-332-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-04-20, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
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Supervisors
Note

QC 20170323

Available from: 2017-03-23 Created: 2017-03-22 Last updated: 2017-03-24Bibliographically approved

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