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Reactive bed filters for treatment of storm water from roads and motorways
KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
KTH, Superseded Departments, Land and Water Resources Engineering.
2004 (English)In: International Scientific-Technical Conference. Surface water, underground water and soils protection along roads and motorways, Eurosystem , 2004, 109-113 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A reactive bed filter is designed according to the purpose of treatment, e.g. for storm water from roads. The construction may be a filter well or a constructed wetland where the most important component is the reactive medium or sorbent. Different types of artificial adsorbents or ion exchange materials are available as commercial products and most of them are utilized when very high treated water standards are required. A filter technology using reactive media has been developed at the Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), where separate filter wells were constructed as a step following the storm water pond. Besides the filter construction, the most important part is the medium or sorbent used. The sorbent is ‘reactive’ for one or several contaminants that have to be removed from the storm water. The term sorbent refers not only to adsorption, but also to processes such as precipitation, ion exchange, complexation and mechanical filtration. Sorption depends heavily on conditions such as pH, concentration of pollutants, ligand concentration, competing ions and particle size. Sorbents may consist of natural materials that are available in large quantities and at a low cost, or of by-products from industrial or agricultural operations. Since they are non-expensive, these materials can be disposed of without expensive regeneration, although one must bear in mind that they can contain hazardous substances after use and have to be treated accordingly. A promising reactive media is Polonite® which has been developed from the bedrock opoka. The paper presents different technical solutions for treating polluted water from traffic areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Eurosystem , 2004. 109-113 p.
Keyword [en]
By-products, filtration, opoka, Polonite, sorbents
National Category
Civil Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-82547ISBN: 83-919499-4-X (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-82547DiVA: diva2:499545
Conference
International Scientific-Technical Conference. Surface water, underground water and soils protection along roads and motorways, Krzyzowa, Poland, 17-19 November 2004
Note
NQCAvailable from: 2012-02-13 Created: 2012-02-12 Last updated: 2012-02-21Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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Output format
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