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Injury data from unhelmeted football head impacts evaluated against critical strain tolerance curves
The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Neuronic Engineering.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0125-0784
The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.
2012 (English)In: Institution of Mechanical Engineers. Proceedings. Part P: Journal of Sports, Engineering and Technology, ISSN 1754-3371, Vol. 226, no 3-4, 177-184 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concussion is a prevalent injury in collision and contact sports, but the biomechanics of concussion has mainly been assessed for helmeted head impacts. Concussion and no-injury cases had previously been reconstructed using rigid body simulations from a larger video database of unhelmeted head impact cases from Australian rules football, rugby union and rugby league. The KTH finite element human head model was used to simulate the 27 concussion and 13 no-injury cases, and the maximum principle strain levels in the corpus callosum were evaluated. The rotational kinematics and strain levels were compared to critical strain tolerance curves and reconstructed pedestrian impacts from the literature. It was found that the 5% critical strain tolerance curve equated to a maximum principal strain level of approximately 0.20 and was associated with concussive impacts involving prolonged loss of consciousness. The results suggest rotational kinematics above 4500 rad/s(2) and 33 rad/s for peak resultant angular acceleration and maximum change in resultant angular velocity, respectively, as tentative tolerance levels for concussion involving prolonged loss of consciousness. Cases involving short duration or no loss of consciousness had similar rotational kinematics and strain levels in the corpus callosum, suggesting that these injuries are of similar severity. The findings support the hypothesis that sports concussions share some biomechanical characteristics with diffuse axonal injury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2012. Vol. 226, no 3-4, 177-184 p.
Keyword [en]
Brain injury, concussion, finite element, impact reconstruction, injury tolerance, strain
National Category
Other Medical Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-89527DOI: 10.1177/1754337112438305ISI: 000308320000004Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84874061999OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-89527DiVA: diva2:503102
Note

QC 20121106

Available from: 2012-02-14 Created: 2012-02-14 Last updated: 2012-11-06Bibliographically approved

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Kleiven, Svein

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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  • de-DE
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Output format
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