Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Life Cycle Impacts of Road Infrastructure: Assessment of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Urban Planning and Environment, Environmental Strategies.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-7040-4623
2012 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Road infrastructure is essential in the development of human society, but has both negative and positive impacts. Large amounts of money and natural resources are spent each year on its construction, operation and maintenance. Obviously, there is potentially significantenvironmental impact associated with these activities. Thus the need for integration of life cycle environmental impacts of road infrastructure into transport planning is currently being widely recognised on international and national level. However certain issues, such as energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the construction, maintenance and operation of road infrastructure, are rarely considered during the current transport planning process in Sweden and most other countries.This thesis examined energy use and GHG emissions for the whole life cycle (construction, operation, maintenance and end-of-life) of road infrastructure, with the aim of improving transport planning on both strategic and project level. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) was applied to two selected case studies: LCA of a road tunnel and LCA of three methods for asphalt recycling and reuse: hot in-plant, hot in-place and reuse as unbound material. The impact categories selected for analysis were Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) and Global Warming Potential (GWP). Other methods used in the research included interviews and a literature review.The results of the first case study indicated that the operational phase of the tunnel contributed the highest share of CED and GWP throughout the tunnel’s life cycle. Construction of concrete tunnels had much higher CED and GWP per lane-metre than construction of rocktunnels. The results of the second case study showed that hot in-place recycling of asphalt gave slightly more net savings of GWP and CED than hot in-plant recycling. Asphalt reuse was less environmentally beneficial than either of these alternatives, resulting in no net savings of GWP and minor net savings of CED. Main sources of data uncertainty identified in the two case-studies included prediction of future electricity mix and inventory data for asphalt concrete.This thesis contributes to methodological development which will be useful to future infrastructure LCAs in terms of inventory data collection. It presents estimated amounts of energy use and GHG emissions associated with road infrastructure, on the example of roadtunnel and asphalt recycling. Operation of road infrastructure and production of construction materials are identified as the main priorities for decreasing GHG emissions and energy use during the life cycle of road infrastructure. It was concluded that the potential exists for significant decreases in GHG emissions and energy use associated with the road transport system if the entire life cycle of road infrastructure is taken into consideration from the very start of the policy-making process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012. , 41 p.
Series
Trita-SOM , ISSN 1653-6126 ; 2012-01
Keyword [en]
Cumulative Energy Demand (CED), Global Warming Potential (GWP), Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), road infrastructure, strategic planning
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-89885ISBN: 978-91-7501-259-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-89885DiVA: diva2:503911
Presentation
2012-03-09, L1, Drottning Kristinas väg 30, KTH, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note
QC 20120229Available from: 2012-02-29 Created: 2012-02-17 Last updated: 2012-02-29Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Literature review: Assessment of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions generated by transport infrastructure
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Literature review: Assessment of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions generated by transport infrastructure
2009 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2009. 42 p.
Series
TRITA-INFRA-FMS, ISSN 1652-5442 ; 2009:8
Keyword
transport systems, infrastructure, LCA, energy use, greenhouse gas emissions, road, railway.
National Category
Environmental Analysis and Construction Information Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-45614 (URN)
Note
QC 20111102Available from: 2011-11-02 Created: 2011-10-31 Last updated: 2012-02-29Bibliographically approved
2. Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions during the Life Cycle Stages of a Road Tunnel: the Swedish Case Norra Länken
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions during the Life Cycle Stages of a Road Tunnel: the Swedish Case Norra Länken
2012 (English)In: European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research, ISSN 1567-7133, E-ISSN 1567-7141, Vol. 12, no 1, 39-62 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inclusion of Life Cycle Assessment during the planning of transport infrastructure is rarely used in practice, but is becoming a widely discussed issue nowadays. This study sought to improve understanding of the life cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of transport infrastructure, using the example of a road tunnel. Two levels of analysis were used: 1) detailed data inventory for the construction of rock tunnels; and 2) screening assessment for the life cycle phases of the whole tunnel infrastructure (including its main parts: concrete and rock tunnels). The first level of analysis showed that production of materials (i.e. concrete and asphalt) made the largest contribution to Cumulative Energy Demand and Global Warming Potential. The second level of analysis indicated that concrete tunnels had much higher Cumulative Energy Demand and Global Warming Potential per lane-metre than rock tunnels. Moreover, the operational phase of the tunnel was found to have the highest share of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions throughout the tunnel’s life cycle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Delft University of Technology, 2012
Keyword
Cumulative Energy Demand, Global Warming Potential, Life Cycle Assessment, tunnel
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-57979 (URN)000298249600003 ()2-s2.0-83455250607 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20140912

Available from: 2012-01-20 Created: 2012-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
3. Opportunities for environmentally improved asphalt recycling: the example of Sweden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Opportunities for environmentally improved asphalt recycling: the example of Sweden
2013 (English)In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 43, 156-165 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Asphalt waste from State roads in Sweden is usually recycled in order to preserve natural resources and reduce the burden on landfill. However, there appears to be a knowledge gap regarding the methods of asphalt recycling used by municipalities and private owners in Sweden. There is also a lack of knowledge regarding best practice from a life cycle environmental point of view. This study identified and evaluated potential ways of improving the life cycle environmental performance of asphalt recycling in Sweden. Data and information about the current situation of asphalt recycling in Sweden were collected through reviewing the literature and through interviews. It was observed that asphalt recycling practices were different for all three groups of road owners: the State, represented by the Swedish Transport Administration (STA), municipalities and industry. Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology was used to identify processes within asphalt recycling and reuse that contribute a significant share of the total environmental impact (hotspots), and to compare the life cycle environmental performance of the main techniques used for asphalt recycling and reuse in Sweden: hot in-plant, hot in-place and reuse as an unbound material. The results showed that hot in-place recycling gave slightly more global warming potential (GWP) and cumulative energy demand (CED) savings than hot in-plant recycling. There were no savings of GWP and small savings of CED during asphalt reuse. It was concluded that asphalt recycling is environmentally preferable to asphalt reuse. However each method of asphalt recycling can provide different benefits, so possibilities exist for improving the environmental performance of the processes involved. These possibilities were subdivided into logistic, technical and organisational.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2013
Keyword
asphalt recycling, asphalt reuse, Cumulative Energy Demand, Global Warming Potential, Life Cycle Assessment
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-89886 (URN)10.1016/j.jclepro.2012.12.040 (DOI)000317547100017 ()2-s2.0-84873397881 (Scopus ID)
Note

QC 20130524

Available from: 2012-02-17 Created: 2012-02-17 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(5970 kB)1027 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 5970 kBChecksum SHA-512
129ec9eedd287a5a91c85ccd548e3375018cf26e42c4f33b040622a66e37afe9677f2ea6d574fa9700c7df43d385d525b5c4ad5fb06df0f5742558512abf3463
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Authority records BETA

Miliutenko, Sofiia

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Miliutenko, Sofiia
By organisation
Environmental Strategies
Environmental Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 1027 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 1620 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf