Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Occurrence of arsenic-contaminated groundwater in alluvial aquifers from delta plains, eastern India: Options for safe drinking water supply
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630). (KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Research Group)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4350-9950
Department of Chemistry, University of Kalyani, Kalyani-741 235, India.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630). (KTH-International Groundwater Arsenic Reserach Group)
1997 (English)In: International Journal of Water Resources Development, ISSN 0790-0627, Vol. 13, no 1, 79-92 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Arsenic contamination in groundwater used for drinking purposes has been envisaged as a problem of global concern. Exploitation of groundwater contaminated with arsenic within the delta plains in West Bengal has caused adverse health effects among the population within a span of 8-10 years. The sources of arsenic in natural water are a function of the local geology, hydrology and geochemical characteristics of the aquifers. The retention and mobility of different arsenic species are sensitive to varying redox conditions. The delta plains in West Bengal are characterized by a series of meander belts formed by the fluvial processes comprising different cycles of complete or truncated fining upward sequences (sand-silt-clay). The arseniferous groundwater belts are mainly located in the upper delta plain and in abandoned meander channels. Mineralogical investigations have established that arsenic in the silty day as well as in the sandy layers occurs as coatings on mineral grains. Clayey sediments intercalated with sandy aquifers at depths between 20 and 80 m are reported as a major source of arsenic in groundwater. Integrated knowledge on geological, hydrological and geochemical characteristics of the multi-level aquifer system of the upper delta plain is therefore necessary in predicting the origin, occurrence and mobility of arsenic in groundwater in West Bengal. This would also provide a basis for developing suitable low-cost techniques for safe drinking water supply in the region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London, UK: Routledge, 1997. Vol. 13, no 1, 79-92 p.
Keyword [en]
pollution; groundwater quality; potable water; water management; water pollution; water resources; water supply
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-90080DOI: 10.1080/07900629749944OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-90080DiVA: diva2:504079
Note

NR 20140805

Available from: 2012-02-17 Created: 2012-02-17 Last updated: 2015-11-11Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full texthttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07900629749944

Authority records BETA

Bhattacharya, Prosun

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Bhattacharya, ProsunJacks, Gunnar
By organisation
Land and Water Resources Engineering (moved 20130630)
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 47 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf