Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
MtDNA analysis confirms early Pre‐Colombian origins of Native Americandogs
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Gene Technology.
Show others and affiliations
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Dogs were present in Pre‐Columbian America, presumably brought to the New World by early human migrants of Asian origin. However, the extent to which historical Arctic, North and South American breeds, e.g. the Alaskan Malamute, Inuit, Eskimo and Greenland dogs, Xoloitzcuintli, Chihuahua and Perro Sín Pelo del Peru, are descendants of these original dogs or were replaced by European dogs remains to be assessed. Using a comprehensive phylogeographic analysis to trace the origin of their mitochondrial (mt) DNA lineages, these breeds were analysed for 582 bp of the mtDNA control region and compared to extensive samples of East Asian (n = 984) and European dogs (n = 639), and previously published Pre‐Columbian sequences. Evidence for a Pre‐Columbian origin was found for all putative American breeds based on the detection of haplotypes phylogenetically distinct from European haplotypes, exclusive to America, shared only with East Asia, or identical to ancient American sequences. Identical rare haplotypes in ancient and modern samples showed geographic continuity over time in Mexico (Chihuahua) and Alaska (Alaskan Malamute). A European origin for at most 15% of the female lineages was indicated, suggesting marginal replacement by European dogs. We also analysed free‐ranging dogs from the USA and South America. In agreement with a previous study, free ranging dogs in general showed little pre‐Columbian ancestry. However, for several populations an appreciable proportion of indigenous ancestry was indicated. Specifically, we provide the first DNA‐based evidence for an ancient Asian origin of the Carolina Dog, a dingo‐like free‐ranging population in the USA. Numerous dogs were probably brought from Asia, since totally 13 mtDNA haplotypes among extant and ancient American dogs were distinct from haploypes found in Europe.

Keyword [en]
Dog, mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA, America, Pre‐Columbian
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-94424OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-94424DiVA: diva2:525854
Note
QS 2012Available from: 2012-05-09 Created: 2012-05-09 Last updated: 2012-05-10Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Analysis of the origin and spread of the domestic dog using Y-chromosome DNA and mtDNA sequence data
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of the origin and spread of the domestic dog using Y-chromosome DNA and mtDNA sequence data
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The domestic dog was probably the first domesticated animal, and the only one to spread to all continents in ancient times. The dog is one of the most phenotypically diverse animals, a result of human selection throughout dog history. Studies of the genetic origins and early spread of domestic dogs is important to gather information about biological and cultural mechanisms behind domestication but also to investigate early human history. The step from a hunter and gatherer lifestyle to farming is one of the most important steps in human history. In this thesis I will present work aimed at understanding both domestic dog origins and dispersal. In order to be able to investigate dog origins based on a second haploid chromosome we identified 14,437 bp of Y-chromosomal DNA sequence. Based on this we show that dogs in Asia south of Yangtze River (ASY) has the highest genetic diversity and was founded from a large number of wolf founders confirming earlier mtDNA results. Early dog dispersal is tightly coupled to human history with the dog brought along as a cultural item. We have for the first time investigated the dog dispersal into Polynesia and Australia and our data can be used as evidence for a more complex settlement of Polynesia than earlier indicated from archaeological and linguistic studies. Analysis of Y-chromosome SNPs in Australian dingoes confirms earlier mtDNA genetic studies that the dingo is part of the domestic dog phylogeny and was founded from a small population of domestic dogs. We have also for the first time investigated the dog population on Madagascar and our data strongly indicates a mainland African origin for the Madagascan dogs. Finally, we have investigated the American dog population sampled from throughout the continent and also for the first time included putative indigenous breed dogs such as Chihuahua and Pero Sín Pelo del Peru, and the free-ranging Carolina dogs from southern USA. Our data clearly indicates a primarily Old World origin for the indigenous breed dogs and also for the free-ranging Carolina dogs in USA. We can also for the first time present evidence for continuity between the ancient and extant dog population with e.g. exclusive sharing of a haplotype between a modern sample of Chihuahua and an ancient Mexican sample.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012. 66 p.
Series
Trita-BIO-Report, ISSN 1654-2312 ; 2012:6
Keyword
mtDNA, domestication, Y-chromosome, SNP, ASY, dog, dingo
National Category
Other Industrial Biotechnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-94145 (URN)978-91-7501-364-0 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-05-25, Lennart Nilsson-salen, Nobels väg 15A, Solna, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note
QC 20120510Available from: 2012-05-10 Created: 2012-05-08 Last updated: 2012-05-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Authority records BETA

Savolainen, Peter

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Zhang, Ai-bingOskarsson, MattiasKlütsch, CornelyaSavolainen, Peter
By organisation
Gene Technology
Biological Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 4531 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf