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Inter-ring Pressure in Heavy-duty Diesel Engines: Development of a Simple test Method
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.).
2007 (English)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. , 36 p.
Series
Trita-MMK, ISSN 1400-1179 ; 2007:14
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-9284OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-9284DiVA: diva2:54428
Note
QC 20101112Available from: 2008-10-16 Created: 2008-10-16 Last updated: 2010-11-12Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Oil-related Particle Emissions from Diesel Engines
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oil-related Particle Emissions from Diesel Engines
2008 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In recent decades much effort has gone into reducing particle emissions in the exhaust gases of heavy-duty diesel engines. Engine development has now reached the stage where it is worth to put heavy focus on the contribution of lubricating oil to particulate emissions in order to further reduce these emissions.

A literature study demonstrates that the cylinder system is usually the largest source of oil-related particles. Oil consumption in the cylinder can be divided into throw-off effects when inertia forces act on the piston, piston rings and oil; evaporation from hot surfaces; reverse blow-by when gas pressure drives the oil consumption; and top land scraping when oil is scraped off the cylinder liner.

The pressure between the compression rings strongly affects the stability and position of the upper compression ring as well as the oil consumption caused by the reverse blow-by. A method to measure the inter-ring pressure was developed and evaluated. The measurements showed that cycle-to-cycle variations were small, but that the inter-ring pressure varied over time. Calculations with AVL Excite Piston and Rings confirmed that ring gap positions can have a major influence on the inter-ring pressure.

The measured particle size and number distributions at motoring conditions show interesting and unexpected results. The high number of particles with a diameter of around 100 nm was greatly reduced when the temperature in the diluter was increased. The mean number particle diameter decreased until 10 nm and then became stable independent of further temperature increase. Other authors have found that the small particles (nucleation mode) are reduced and the larger particles (accumulation mode) are more or less unaffected when exhaust gases are heated up and diluted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH, 2008. 19 p.
Series
Trita-MMK, ISSN 1400-1179 ; 2008:08
Keyword
Diesel engine, Particle emissions, Particulate matter, PM, Lubrication oil, Inter-ring pressure
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-9287 (URN)
Presentation
2008-09-26, Sal A425, KTH, Brinellvägen 83, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Supervisors
Note
QC 20101112Available from: 2008-10-16 Created: 2008-10-16 Last updated: 2010-11-12Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
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