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Porous Cellulose Materials from Nano Fibrillated Cellulose
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Fibre and Polymer Technology, Fibre Technology.
2012 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the first part of this work a novel type of low-density, sponge-like material for the separation of mixtures of oil and water has been prepared by vapour deposition of hydrophobic silanes on ultra-porous nanocellulose aerogels. To achieve this, a highly porous (> 99 %) nanocellulose aerogel with high structural flexibility and robustness is first formed by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of the nanocellulose. The density, pore size distribution and wetting properties of the aerogel can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the nanocellulose dispersion before freeze-drying. The hydrophobic light-weight aerogels are almost instantly filled with the oil phase when they selectively absorb oil from water, with a capacity to absorb up to 45 times their own weight. The oil can also be drained from the aerogel and the aerogel can then be subjected to a second absorption cycle.In the second part of the work a novel, lightweight and strong porous cellulose material has been prepared by drying aqueous foams stabilized with surface-modified NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC). Confocal microscopy and high-speed video imaging show that the long-term stability of the wet foams can be attributed to the octylamine-coated, rod-shaped NFC nanoparticles residing at the air-liquid interface which prevent the air bubbles from collapsing or coalescing. Careful removal of the water yields a porous cellulose-based material with a porosity of 98 % and a density of 30 mg cm-3. These porous cellulose materials have a higher Young’s modulus than other cellulose materials made by freeze drying and a compressive energy absorption of 56 kJ m-3 at 80 % strain. Measurements with an autoporosimeter reveal that most pores are in the range of 300 to 500 μm.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012. , iv, 22 p.
Series
Trita-CHE-Report, ISSN 1654-1081 ; 2012:40
National Category
Polymer Technologies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-104196ISBN: 978-91-7501-478-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-104196DiVA: diva2:563407
Presentation
2012-11-30, K2, Teknikringen 28, KTH, Stockholm, 14:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Note

QC 20121107

Available from: 2012-11-07 Created: 2012-10-30 Last updated: 2012-11-07Bibliographically approved
List of papers
1. Ultra porous nanocellulose aerogels as separation medium for mixtures of oil/water liquids
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ultra porous nanocellulose aerogels as separation medium for mixtures of oil/water liquids
2012 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 19, no 2, 401-410 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A novel type of sponge-like material for the separation of mixed oil and water liquids has been prepared by the vapour deposition of hydrophobic silanes on ultra-porous nanocellulose aerogels. To achieve this, a highly porous (> 99%) nanocellulose aerogel with high structural flexibility and robustness is first formed by freeze-drying an aqueous dispersion of the nanocellulose. The density, pore size distribution and wetting properties of the aerogel can be tuned by selecting the concentration of the nanocellulose dispersion before freeze-drying. The hydrophobic light- weight aerogels are almost instantly filled with the oil phase when selectively absorbing oil from water, with a capacity to absorb up to 45 times their own weight in oil. The oil can also be drained from the aerogel and the aerogel can then be reused for a second absorption cycle.

Keyword
Absorption, Aerogel, Cellulose, Desorption, Oleophilic, Separation, Superhydrophobic
National Category
Paper, Pulp and Fiber Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-91596 (URN)10.1007/s10570-011-9629-5 (DOI)000300518500009 ()2-s2.0-84857356613 (Scopus ID)
Note
QC 20120402Available from: 2012-04-02 Created: 2012-03-19 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
2. Lightweight and strong cellulose materials made from aqueous foams stabilized by NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lightweight and strong cellulose materials made from aqueous foams stabilized by NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC)
Show others...
(English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

 A novel, lightweight and strong porous cellulose material has been prepared by drying aqueous foams stabilized with surface-modified NanoFibrillated Cellulose (NFC). This material differs from other particle stabilized foams in that we use renewable cellulose as stabilizing particle. Confocal microscopy and high speed video imaging show that the long-term stability of the wet foams can be attributed to the octylamine-coated, rod-shaped NFC nanoparticles residing at the air-liquid interface which prevent the air bubbles from collapsing or coalescing. This can be achieved at solids content around 1 % by weight. Careful removal of the water results in a cellulose-based material with a porosity of 98 % and a density of 30 mg cm-3. These porous cellulose materials have a higher Young’s modulus than other cellulose materials made by freeze drying and a compressive energy absorption of 56 kJ m-3 at 80 % strain. Measurement with the aid of an autoporosimeter revealed that most pores are in the range of 300 to 500 μm.

National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-104223 (URN)
Note

QS 2012

Available from: 2012-10-30 Created: 2012-10-30 Last updated: 2012-11-07Bibliographically approved

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