Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Biogas from mechanical pulping industry: Potential improvement for increased biomass vehicle fuels
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0635-7372
2012 (English)In: Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization and Simulation of Energy Conversion Systems and Processes, ECOS 2012, 2012, Vol. 5, 56-67 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Biogas is a vehicle fuel of the first generation of biofuels with great potential for reducing the climate impact from the transport sector. Today biogas is mainly produced by digestion in Sweden and the total amounts to 1.4 TWhLHV/year (2010) of which about 0.6 TWhLHV is upgraded and used in the transport sector. Using industrial wastewater, e.g. from a pulp and paper mill, as substrate for production of biogas, the amount of renewable fuel to the transport sector could be increased. In the pulping industry, substantial amounts of organic matter are generated; this is commonly treated aerobically to reduce the chemical oxygen demand (COD) in the effluent streams before discharge to a recipient. Treating these effluent streams mainly anaerobically instead could contribute to the transport sector's energy supply. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential for using effluent streams from the Swedish mechanical pulp and paper industry to produce biogas. A typical Swedish mechanical pulp mill is considered for anaerobic treatment of the wastewaters. This type of pulp mill presently uses conventional methods for wastewater treatment to reduce COD, but converting most of this to anaerobic treatment would increase the amount of biogas produced. When considering this conversion in a larger context, supposing that anaerobic treatment would be applied to all Swedish mechanical pulp mills, which stand for about 30% of the total Swedish pulp production, it is shown that the production could amount to as much as 0.5 TWhLHV/year of biogas. This represents about one third of the biogas produced in Sweden today. The main conclusion of this study is that if anaerobic treatment of effluent streams from the pulping industry were introduced, the biogas production in Sweden could be significantly increased, thus moving one step further in reducing the transport sector's climate impact.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 5, 56-67 p.
Keyword [en]
Anaerobic digestion, Biofuel, Biogas, Mechanical pulping, Vehicle fuel, Wastewater treatment
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-98089Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84896370780ISBN: 978-886655322-9 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-98089DiVA: diva2:570062
Conference
25th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization and Simulation of Energy Conversion Systems and Processes, ECOS 2012, Perugia, Italy, 26 June 2012 through 29 June 2012
Funder
StandUp
Note

QC 20121116

Available from: 2012-11-16 Created: 2012-06-19 Last updated: 2015-04-23Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Energy systems studied of biogas: Generation aspects of renewable vehicle fuels in the transport system
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy systems studied of biogas: Generation aspects of renewable vehicle fuels in the transport system
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The transport sector is seen as particularly problematic when concerns about climate change and dependency on fossil energy are discussed. Because of this, bioenergy is strongly promoted for use in the transport sector, both on a European level and nationally in Sweden. Even though bioenergy is considered one of the key solutions, it is generally agreed that both supply- and demand-side measures will be needed to achieve a change to a more sustainable transport system. One of the reasons for this is the limited availability of biomass, especially agricultural feedstocks competing with food or feed production. Woody biomass, however more abundant, is also exposed to tough competition from other sectors. In this thesis, the role of biogas as a vehicle fuel in a future sustainable transport system is discussed together with the prerequisites needed to realise such a transport system. Biogas is a biofuel that could be produced in several different ways: by anaerobic digestion, which is a first-generation production route, by gasification, which is a second-generation process, and by catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, a third-generation technology. The main focus in this thesis is on biogas produced by anaerobic digestion and the results show that there is a significant potential for an increase compared to today’s production. Biogas from anaerobic digestion, however, will only be able to cover a minor part of the demand in the Swedish transport sector. Considering biogas of the second and third generations, the potential for production is more uncertain in a mid-term future, mainly due to competition for feedstock, the possibility to produce other fuels by these processes, and the present immaturity of the technology. The limited potential for replacing fossil vehicle fuels, either by biogas or other renewable fuels, clearly shows the need for demand-side measures in the transport system as well. This thesis shows the importance of technical and non-technical means to decrease the demand for transport and to make the transport as efficient as possible. The results show that both energy-efficient vehicles and behavioural and infrastructural changes will be required. Policies and economic incentives set by governments and decision-making bodies have a prominent role to play, in order to bring about a shift to a more sustainable transport system, however, measures taken on individual level will also have a great impact to contribute to a more sustainable transport system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012. xiii, 67 p.
Series
Trita-CHE-Report, ISSN 1654-1081 ; 2012:54
Keyword
Anaerobic digestion, biogas, biomass, energy system, first-generation biofuels, renewable vehicle fuels, second-generation biofuels, supply- and demand-side measures, third-generation biofuels, transport system
National Category
Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-105120 (URN)978-91-7501-516-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-12-07, F3, Lindstedtsvägen 26, KTH, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20121116

Available from: 2012-11-16 Created: 2012-11-16 Last updated: 2012-12-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Scopus

Authority records BETA

Alvfors, Per

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Magnusson, MimmiAlvfors, Per
By organisation
Energy Processes
Energy Systems

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 219 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf