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Graphene for More Moore and More Than Moore applications
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1234-6060
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4637-8001
KTH, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Integrated Devices and Circuits.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-6430-6135
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2012 (English)In: IEEE Silicon Nanoelectronics Workshop, SNW, IEEE , 2012, 6243322- p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Graphene has caught the attention of the electronic device community as a potential future option for More Moore and More Than Moore devices and applications. This is owed to its remarkable material properties, which include ballistic conductance over several hundred nanometers or charge carrier mobilities of several 100.000 cm 2/Vs in pristine graphene. Furthermore, standard CMOS technology may be applied to graphene in order to make devices. Integrated graphene devices, however, are performance limited by scattering due to defects in the graphene and its dielectric environment [1, 2] and high contact resistance [3, 4]. In addition, graphene has no energy band gap (Figure 1) and hence graphene MOSFETs (GFETs) cannot be switched off, but instead show ambipolar behaviour [5]. This has steered interest away from logic to analog radio frequency (RF) applications [6, 7]. This talk will systematically compare the expected RF performance of realistic GFETs with current silicon CMOS technology [8]. GFETs slightly lag behind in maximum cut-off frequency F T,max (Figure 2) up to a carrier mobility of 3000 cm 2/Vs, where they can achieve similar RF performance as 65nm silicon FETs. While a strongly nonlinear voltage-dependent gate capacitance inherently limits performance, other parasitics such as contact resistance are expected to be optimized as GFET process technology improves.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IEEE , 2012. 6243322- p.
Keyword [en]
Carrier mobility, CMOS integrated circuits, Contact resistance
National Category
Electrical Engineering, Electronic Engineering, Information Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-105436DOI: 10.1109/SNW.2012.6243322Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84867218851ISBN: 978-146730994-3 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-105436DiVA: diva2:571269
Conference
2012 17th IEEE Silicon Nanoelectronics Workshop, SNW 2012, 10 June 2012 through 11 June 2012, Honolulu, HI
Funder
StandUp
Note

QC 20121122

Available from: 2012-11-22 Created: 2012-11-21 Last updated: 2013-04-16Bibliographically approved

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Vaziri, SamLi, JiantongRusu, Ana

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Lemme, Max C.Vaziri, SamSmith, Anderson D.Li, JiantongRodriguez, SaulRusu, AnaÖstling, Mikael
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