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Integration Feasibilities for Combined Cycles in Biofuel Production
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
KTH, School of Chemical Science and Engineering (CHE), Chemical Engineering and Technology, Energy Processes.
2011 (English)In: Proceedings of the 24th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2011, Nis University , 2011, 3498-3508 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to evaluate the opportunities for gas turbine integration into biofuel production. When producing biofuels via gasification, a significant amount of the input of chemical energy is converted to reaction heat. A steam cycle is therefore used to recover the heat to useful power, but despite that, the plant often remains net users of electricity. To further enhance the production several studies suggest integration of gas turbines, often fired with offgas from the fuel synthesis. The excess of low level heat in the gas turbine exhaust is successfully integrated in the steam cycle which creates integration synergies. Gasification of biomass for fuel synthesis generally implies that oxygen is used as gasification agent. Despite the synergies in the joint steam cycle, the positive effects are outweighed by the energy penalty from oxygen production. Conclusively, serial production of biofuel and power is not beneficial. More interesting is the integrating of a parallel, air-blown gasifier to produce syngas for the gas turbine. Also the natural gas fired gas turbines have successfully been integrated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nis University , 2011. 3498-3508 p.
Keyword [en]
Biofuel, Biomass, Combined Cycle, Hybrid, Polygeneration, Syngas
National Category
Energy Engineering Chemical Process Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-105547Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84903647615ISBN: 978-866055016-5 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-105547DiVA: diva2:571422
Conference
24th International Conference on Efficiency, Cost, Optimization, Simulation and Environmental Impact of Energy Systems, ECOS 2011, Novi Sad, Serbia, 4 July 2011 through 7 July 2011
Note

QC 20121123

Available from: 2012-11-23 Created: 2012-11-22 Last updated: 2015-04-22Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Energy system evaluation of thermo-chemical biofuel production: Process development by integration of power cycles and sustainable electricity
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Energy system evaluation of thermo-chemical biofuel production: Process development by integration of power cycles and sustainable electricity
2012 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Fossil fuels dominate the world energy supply today and the transport sector is no exception. Renewable alternatives must therefore be introduced to replace fossil fuels and their emissions, without sacrificing our standard of living. There is a good potential for biofuels but process improvements are essential, to ensure efficient use of a limited amount of biomass and better compete with fossil alternatives. The general aim of this research is therefore to investigate how to improve efficiency in biofuel production by process development and co-generation of heat and electricity. The work has been divided into three parts; power cycles in biofuel production, methane production via pyrolysis and biofuels from renewable electricity.

The studies of bio-based methanol plants showed that steam power generation has a key role in the large-scale biofuel production process. However, a large portion of the steam from the recovered reaction heat is needed in the fuel production process. One measure to increase steam power generation, evaluated in this thesis, is to lower the steam demand by humidification of the gasification agent. Pinch analysis indicated synergies from gas turbine integration and our studies concluded that the electrical efficiency for natural gas fired gas turbines amounts to 56-58%, in the same range as for large combined cycle plants. The use of the off-gas from the biofuel production is also a potential integration option but difficult for modern high-efficient gas turbines. Furthermore, gasification with oxygen and extensive syngas cleaning might be too energy-consuming for efficient power generation.

Methane production via pyrolysis showed improved efficiency compared with the competing route via gasification. The total biomass to methane efficiency, including additional biomass to fulfil the power demand, was calculated to 73-74%. The process benefits from lower thermal losses and less reaction heat when syngas is avoided as an intermediate step and can handle high-alkali fuels such as annual crops.

Several synergies were discovered when integrating conventional biofuel production with addition of hydrogen. Introducing hydrogen would also greatly increase the biofuel production potential for regions with limited biomass resources. It was also concluded that methane produced from electrolysis of water could be economically feasible if the product was priced in parity with petrol.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2012. v, 68 p.
Series
Trita-CHE-Report, ISSN 1654-1081 ; 2012:59
Keyword
Biomass, Gasification, Methane, SNG, Power to Gas, Pyrolysis
National Category
Energy Systems Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-105814 (URN)978-91-7415-835-9 (ISBN)
Public defence
2012-12-14, Sal E3, Osquarsbacke 14, KTH, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20121127

Available from: 2012-11-27 Created: 2012-11-27 Last updated: 2012-11-27Bibliographically approved

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