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Coagulant proteins identified in Mustard: a potential water treatment agent
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
KTH, School of Biotechnology (BIO), Industrial Biotechnology.
Anna University, Chennai.
Anna University, Chennai.
Show others and affiliations
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 1735-1472, E-ISSN 1735-2630, Vol. 11, no 4, 873-880 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of natural coagulant protein in drinking water treatment has been discussed for a long time, though the method is still not in practice, probably due to limited knowledge and availability of material. In the present work, different Mustard varieties were tested for the presence of coagulant protein compared with Moringa seed extract and their potential application in water treatment. The coagulation activity of the protein extract was measured using synthetic clay solution as well as water from pond. The protein content was determined by Bradford method, molecular mass determined by Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and peptide sequence was analyzed by Mass spectrometry. Extract of Mustard (large) and Moringa seed showed coagulation activity of a parts per thousand...70 and a parts per thousand...85 % after 90 min, respectively. Interestingly, seed extracts from other Mustard varieties had coagulation activity after heat activation at 95 A degrees C for 5 h. However, the coagulation activity of Mustard seed extract against turbid pond water was higher (a parts per thousand...60 %) compared to Moringa seed extract (a parts per thousand...50 %). The peptide sequence analysis of 6.5 and 9 kDa proteins was found to be homologous to Moringa coagulant protein and napin3, respectively. To our knowledge, this could be the first report on Mustard seed having coagulant protein. The coagulation activity of Mustard (large) against highly turbid pond water suggested that it could be a potential natural coagulant for water treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 11, no 4, 873-880 p.
Keyword [en]
Brassica, Napin, Moringa coagulant protein, Peptide sequence, Thermo-tolerant
National Category
Environmental Biotechnology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-107283DOI: 10.1007/s13762-013-0282-4ISI: 000334172200001Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84897519615OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-107283DiVA: diva2:575547
Funder
Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, SWE-2007-401
Note

QC 20140516. Updated from manuscript to article in journal.

Available from: 2012-12-10 Created: 2012-12-10 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Coagulant Protein from plant materials: Potential Water Treatment Agent
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Coagulant Protein from plant materials: Potential Water Treatment Agent
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Access to fresh water is a human right, yet more than 780 million people, especially in rural areas, rely on unimproved sources and the need for finding ways of treating water is crucial. Although the use of natural coagulant protein in drinking water treatment has been discussed for a long time, the method is still not in practice, probably due to availability of material and limited knowledge. In this study, about hundred different crude extracts made from plant materials found in Southern India were screened for coagulation activity. Extracts of three Brassica species (Mustard, Cabbage and Cauliflower) were showing activity comparable to that of Moringa oleifera and were further investigated. Their protein content and profile were compared against each other and with coagulant protein from Moringa. Mustard (large) and Moringa seed proteins were also studied for their effect against clinically isolated bacterial strains. The protein profiles of Brassica extract showed predominant bands around 9kDa and 6.5kDa by SDS-PAGE. The peptide sequence analysis of Mustard large identified the 6.5kDa protein as Moringa coagulant protein (MO2.1) and the 9kDa protein band as seed storage protein napin3. Of thirteen clinical strains analysed, Moringa and Mustard large were proven effective in either aggregation activity or growth kinetic method or both in all thirteen and nine strains respectively. To my knowledge this is the first report on the presence of coagulant protein in Brassica seeds. Owing to the promising results Brassica species could possibly be used as a substitute to Moringa coagulating agent and chemicals in drinking water treatment. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013. 37 p.
Series
Trita-BIO-Report, ISSN 1654-2312 ; 2013:1
Keyword
antimicrobial effect; Brassica; coagulant protein; MO2.1; Moringa oleifera; Mustard; napin; thermo-resistance; plant material; protein extraction; salt extract.
National Category
Environmental Biotechnology Water Treatment
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-107335 (URN)978-91-7501-593-4 (ISBN)
Presentation
2013-01-18, FB55, AlbaNova Universitetscentrum, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20121214

Available from: 2012-12-14 Created: 2012-12-10 Last updated: 2013-09-12Bibliographically approved

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