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The Geopolitics of Energy: Swedish International Dependencies in a Historical Perspective
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7285-7455
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9687-1940
KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Philosophy and History of Technology, History of Science and Technology.
2012 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A metaphor that is often used to describe energy supply is that of a nation’s blood circulation. Indeed, a permanent interruption in the supply of energy would be lethal to any society. Sweden – a neutral country in cold war Europe – belongs to those countries that are, and have been, very strongly dependent on imports of energy, and this implies a special vulnerability. Today two imported energy carriers – oil and uranium – each covers some 30 % of the total.

Sweden is of course not alone in its dependence on imported fuels. The world’s energy resources are unevenly distributed, and since the mid 19th century the pursuit of coal, oil, gas and uranium has been an important constituent of international politics and economics. The strongest nations have used economical, political and if necessary military means to control energy sources in far away territories in order to secure their energy supplies at home. This is often referred to as the geopolitics of energy, and there has been quite some research about it. There has been much less research on how small nations have tried to handle their dependencies on far away countries using “soft” means rather than “hard” ones. By studying how Sweden has done this we hope to contribute to an understanding of the geopolitics of energy of small nations.

We will focus at which actors and which motives that have been central in these decisions and whether it is possible to identify a distinct but evolving ‘Swedish model’ in actors’ attempts to deal with vulnerabilities stemming from energy import dependence, and if this model has applied to the energy system as a whole, i.e. the same model has applied to all types of fuels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012.
Keyword [en]
energy history
National Category
History of Technology
Research subject
SRA - Energy
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-107670OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-107670DiVA: diva2:577055
Conference
StandUp Academy Fall Workshop 2012, 25-26 oktober, 2012, Sigtuna
Projects
Energy and Geopolitics
Funder
StandUp
Note

QC 20121219

Available from: 2012-12-14 Created: 2012-12-14 Last updated: 2012-12-19Bibliographically approved

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Kaijser, ArneHögselius, Per

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Citation style
  • apa
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