Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Visualising gender norms in design: Meet the Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements.
School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Machine Elements. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.
2012 (English)In: International Journal of Design, ISSN 1991-3761, E-ISSN 1994-036X, Vol. 6, no 3, 85-94 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article highlights how a gender perspective can be performed by design as critical practice. Two common household appliances - a drill and a hand blender - were used as a starting point. Inspired by Derrida's term deconstruction, the product language of the tools was analysed and then switched in two new prototypes: the hand blender Mega Hurricane Mixer and the drill Dolphia. The prototypes were shown at exhibitions and lectures. The comments by the audience show that a switching of product language entails that their relationship to the artifact itself also changes. Overall, the elements, which previously had been perceived as 'lacking transparency', were now visible. For example, the drill was identified as a "drill for women" and considered inadequate for drilling, and the mixer revealed needs and functions that the traditional mixer did not satisfy. This implies that design should not only be seen as 'final products' but as a part of a social process that takes place between the user, the artifact and the norms of society. By switching the product languages it was possible to highlight how gender values are connected to each design and each artifact. This means that the design of the artifacts around us is not fixed, but can be renegotiated and situated in time, place, and context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 6, no 3, 85-94 p.
Keyword [en]
Design practice, Gender system, Gendered product language, Social context
National Category
Design
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-116156ISI: 000313074600007Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84871971270OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-116156DiVA: diva2:589501
Note

QC 20130118

Available from: 2013-01-18 Created: 2013-01-16 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. TILLBLIVELSER: En trasslig berättelse om design som normkritisk praktik
Open this publication in new window or tab >>TILLBLIVELSER: En trasslig berättelse om design som normkritisk praktik
2017 (Swedish)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The increasing awareness of norm-critical perspectives (in society, academia and industry) brings with it the need to develop methods to ensure they can be implemented in practice. This thesis discusses how the role of design contributes to and maintains norms, and shows how design as a norm critical practice has great potential to bridge the gap between theory and practice in norm-critical work. This potential lies in using design as a peda-gogic tool that can concretize and make understandable what would otherwise be perceived as complex, unclear or remote. The thesis pays special attention to the role of artefacts in the creation of the stories of the world. The discursive design thing is introduced as a tool to visualize norms and to create discussion. The three-dimensional, physical thing exposes us to a more diverse experience of norms than when we just address them in words or pictures.The empirical work in this thesis stems from five research projects that differ from each other and were carried out under varied conditions. The projects have tackled a range of problems and power relationships. However, together they draw a complex picture of how norms arise, overlap and constantly change over time, place and space – and how design can be used to support or disrupt this process.By revisiting the projects, it becomes clear how the researcher’s position and actions (or non-actions) shape the norm development process. This results in an insight that meaning can not be construc-ted from an outside perspective, but is a constant ”becoming” that occurs in an entanglement of relationships arising between different bodies, both human and non-human. As a norm critical perspective implies paying attention to power relationships, it also assumes a power critical approach to the production of meaning extracted from the norm-critical work, and that we – as researchers and designers – take responsibility for our prevail by highlighting our own bodies and gaze.The thesis therefore proposes the concept of diffraction as an approach to the production of meaning in norm critical design practices. A diffractive approach enables an understanding of how the production of meaning occurs in various coincidences, but also how our own interventions shape the story. It opens up to the realization that parallel narratives are possible and thus becomes a tool to break away from the linear understanding framework and offer an exploration of alternative thought patterns. A diffractive approach to the production of meaning is thus also a tool to pro-mote increased creativity.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2017
Series
TRITA-MMK, ISSN 1400-1179 ; 2017:01
National Category
Design
Research subject
Machine Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-202361 (URN)978-91-7729-277-7 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-03-10, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, Stockholm, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20170222

Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-21 Last updated: 2017-03-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Scopushttp://www.ijdesign.org/ojs/index.php/IJDesign/article/view/1070

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ehrnberger, KarinRäsänen, MinnaIlstedt, Sara
By organisation
Machine ElementsCentre for Sustainable Communications, CESCMedia Technology and Interaction Design, MIDGreen Leap
In the same journal
International Journal of Design
Design

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 529 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf