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Improving machining performance against regenerative tool chatter through adaptive normal pressure at the tool clamping interface
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology. (Machine and Process Technology)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4677-7005
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5960-2159
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Production Engineering, Machine and Process Technology.
2013 (English)In: Journal of Machine Engineering, ISSN 1895-7595, Vol. 13, no 1, 93-105 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chatter in machining process is one of the common failures of a production line. For a cantilever tool, such as a boring bar, the rule of thumb requires the overhang length of the tool to be less than 4 times the diameter. The reason is because longer overhang will induce severe tool vibration in the form of chatter during machining. When a longer overhang than 4 times diameter is necessary for performing special machining operations, damping methods are needed to suppress tool chatter. One of the methods is the constrained layer damping method. Materials, such viscoelastic material, are applied in the vibration node regions of the structure to absorb the concentrated vibration strain energy and transform the mechanical energy to heat. With a cantilever tool clamped in a tool holder, the clamping interface is usually the vibration node region. The friction in the joint interface with low normal pressure became another source of damping and can be used for tool chatter suppression in mechanical structures. Joint interfaces are well known to possess normal pressure dependent stiffness and damping. The normal pressure’s effect on the structures frequency response function had been observed by H. Åkesson [1] et al, and L.Mi [2] et al. However, the direct effect of the joint interface normal pressure on machining process stability hasn’t been investigated. In this paper, a cantilever tool with 6.5 overhang length to diameter ratio is investigated. The direct effect of the tool clamping interface’s normal pressure on the machining process stability is studied. Three different levels of clamping normal pressure are tested with an internal turning process. The machining results indicate another adaptable solution on shop floor for suppressing tool chatter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Poland, 2013. Vol. 13, no 1, 93-105 p.
Keyword [en]
chatter, tool, internal turning, vibration, clamping, damping, interface
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
Järnvägsgruppen - Ljud och vibrationer; SRA - Production
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-122424OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-122424DiVA: diva2:622300
Projects
POPJIMXPRES
Funder
XPRES - Initiative for excellence in production researchEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FoF.NMP.2010-1
Note

QC 20130521

Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-21 Last updated: 2015-11-11Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. High dynamic stiffness nano-structured composites for vibration control: A Study of applications in joint interfaces and machining systems
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High dynamic stiffness nano-structured composites for vibration control: A Study of applications in joint interfaces and machining systems
2015 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Vibration control requires high dynamic stiffness in mechanical structures for a reliable performance under extreme conditions. Dynamic stiffness composes the parameters of stiffness (K) and damping (η) that are usually in a trade-off relationship. This thesis study aims to break the trade-off relationship.

After identifying the underlying mechanism of damping in composite materials and joint interfaces, this thesis studies the deposition technique and physical characteristics of nano-structured HDS (high dynamic stiffness) composite thick-layer coatings. The HDS composite were created by enlarging the internal grain boundary surface area through reduced grain size in nano scale (≤ 40 nm). The deposition process utilizes a PECVD (Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition) method combined with the HiPIMS (High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering) technology. The HDS composite exhibited significantly higher surface hardness and higher elastic modulus compared to Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), yet similar damping property. The HDS composites successfully realized vibration control of cutting tools while applied in their clamping interfaces.

Compression preload at essential joint interfaces was found to play a major role in stability of cutting processes and a method was provided for characterizing joint interface properties directly on assembled structures. The detailed analysis of a build-up structure showed that the vibrational mode energy is shifted by varying the joint interface’s compression preload. In a build-up structure, the location shift of vibration mode’s strain energy affects the dynamic responses together with the stiffness and damping properties of joint interfaces.

The thesis demonstrates that it is possible to achieve high stiffness and high damping simultaneously in materials and structures. Analysis of the vibrational strain energy distribution was found essential for the success of vibration control.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2015. ix, 71 p.
Series
TRITA-IIP, ISSN 1650-1888
Keyword
Vibration control, High dynamic stiffness, Metal matrix composite, Nano structures, Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), Adiabatic, Machining, Regenerative tool chatter
National Category
Nano Technology Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Composite Science and Engineering Fusion, Plasma and Space Physics Chemical Sciences Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology Applied Mechanics
Research subject
Production Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-176869 (URN)978-91-7595-740-1 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-12-01, M311, Brinellvägen 68, KTH, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 608800EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 260048VINNOVA, E!4329VINNOVA, HydroMod
Available from: 2015-11-11 Created: 2015-11-10 Last updated: 2015-11-11Bibliographically approved
2. Joint Interface Effects on Machining System Vibration
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Joint Interface Effects on Machining System Vibration
2013 (English)Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Vibration problems are still the major constraint in modern machining processes that seek higher material removal rate, shorter process time, longer tool life and better product quality. Depending on the process, the weaker structure element can be the tool/tool holder, workpiece/fixture or both. When the tool/tool holder is the main source of vibration, the stability limit is determined in most cases by the ratio of length-to-diameter. Regenerative chatter is the most significant dynamic phenomenon generated through the interaction between machine tool and machining process. As a rule of thumb, the ratio between the tool’s overhang length and the tool’s diameter shouldn’t exceed 4 to maintain a stable machining process while using a conventional machining tool. While a longer tool overhang is needed for specific machining operations, vibration damping solutions are required to ensure a stable machining process. Vibration damping solutions include both active and passive damping solutions. In the passive damping solutions, damping medium such as viscoelastic material is used to transform the vibration strain energy into heat and thereby reduce vibration amplitude. For a typical cantilever tool, the highest oscillation displacement is near the anti-node regions of a vibration mode and the highest oscillation strain energy is concentrated at the node of a vibration mode. Viscoelastic materials have been successfully applied in these regions to exhibit their damping property. The node region of the 1st bending mode is at the joint interfaces where the cantilever tools are clamped. In this thesis, the general method that can be used to measure and characterize the joint interface stiffness and damping properties is developed and improved, joint interfaces’ importance at optimizing the dynamic stiffness of the joint interface is studied, and a novel advancing material that is designed to possess both high young’s modulus and high damping property is introduced. In the joint interface characterization model, a method that can measure the joint interface’s stiffness and damping over the full frequency range with only the assembled structure is presented. With the influence of a joint interface’s normal pressure on its stiffness and damping, an optimized joint interface normal pressure is selected for delivering a stable machining process against chatter with a boring bar setting at 6.5 times overhang length to diameter ratio in an internal turning process. The novel advancing material utilizes the carbon nano particles mixed in a metal matrix, and it can deliver both high damping property and high elastic stiffness to the mechanical structure.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2013. ix, 48 p.
Series
TRITA-IIP, ISSN 1650-1888 ; 13:05
Keyword
Joint Interface, Vibration, Damping, Chatter, Machining, Carbon NanoComposite, PECVD, HiPIMS
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
SRA - Production; Järnvägsgruppen - Ljud och vibrationer
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-122392 (URN)978-91-7501-778-5 (ISBN)
Presentation
2013-05-24, Sal M311, Brinellvägen 68, KTH, Stockholm, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Projects
PoPJIM, HydroMod, XPRES, NanoComfort
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, G62241EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, G62240XPRES - Initiative for excellence in production researchEU, European Research Council, E4329
Note

QC 20130521

Available from: 2013-05-21 Created: 2013-05-20 Last updated: 2015-11-11Bibliographically approved

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