Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Towards the development of adaptive finite element methods for internal flow aeroacoustics
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). KTH, School of Engineering Sciences (SCI), Centres, Linné Flow Center, FLOW. (Computational Technology Laboratory)
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). (Computational Technology Laboratory)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4256-0463
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz). (Computational Technology Laboratory)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1695-8809
2013 (English)In: 19th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference, 2013Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We report the latest results obtained in the development of an adaptive finite element method for computational aeroacoustics (CAA). The new methodology is based on the General Galerkin (G2) method, which has been successfully used for the computation of incompressible, turbulent flow. Here, we simulate the flow past an in-duct mixer plate and compare the results with available experimental data. The comparisons include mean velocity profiles and frequency content of the turbulent signal. No direct simulation of sound or sound wave propagation has been performed; instead, simple analogy arguments have been used to extract acoustic results from incompressible simulations by assuming a direct correlation between the computed pressure drop signal and the sound at the far field. We were able to reproduce the sound signal from experiments with our incompressible simulation and our results compared well with both the level and the broadband frequency peak of the measured sound. We suggest that the methodology presented here is mainly suitable for the prediction of sound in low Mach number pipe flows.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013.
Keyword [en]
Adaptive finite element methods, Broadband frequency, Computational aeroacoustics (CAA), Direct simulation, Frequency contents, Incompressible simulations, Low Mach numbers, Mean velocity profiles
National Category
Computer and Information Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-133278Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84883711946ISBN: 978-162410213-4 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-133278DiVA: diva2:660738
Conference
19th AIAA/CEAS Aeroacoustics Conference; Berlin; Germany; 27 May 2013 through 29 May 2013
Note

QC 20131030

Available from: 2013-10-30 Created: 2013-10-29 Last updated: 2013-10-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Scopus

Authority records BETA

Hoffman, Johan

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Vilela De Abreu, RodrigoHoffman, JohanJansson, Johan
By organisation
High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz)Linné Flow Center, FLOW
Computer and Information Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

isbn
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

isbn
urn-nbn
Total: 179 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf