Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Forced Response in Axial Turbines Under the Influence of Partial Admission
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1033-9601
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Energy Technology, Heat and Power Technology.
2013 (English)In: Journal of turbomachinery, ISSN 0889-504X, E-ISSN 1528-8900, Vol. 135, no 4, 041014- p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High cycle fatigue (HCF) due to unforeseen excitation frequencies, underestimated force magnitudes, or a combination of both causes control-stage failures for steam turbine stakeholders. This paper provides an extended design criteria toolbox, as well as validation data, for control-stage design based on experimental data to reduce HCF incidents in partial-admission turbines. The upstream rotor in a two-stage air test turbine is instrumented with pressure transducers and strain gauges. Admission degrees extend from 28.6% to 100%, as one or two admission arcs are simulated by blocking segmental arcs immediately upstream of the first stator vanes with aerodynamically shaped filling blocks. Sweeps across a speed range of 50%-105% of design speed are performed at a constant turbine pressure ratio during simultaneous high-speed acquisition. A forced-response analysis is performed and results presented in Campbell diagrams. Partial admission creates a large number of low-engine-order forced responses because of the blockage, pumping, loading, and unloading processes. Combinations of the number of rotor blades and low-engine-order excitations are the principal sources of forced-response vibrations for the turbine studied here. Altering the stator and/or rotor pitches changes the excitation pattern. We observed that a relationship between the circumferential lengths of the admitted and nonadmitted arcs dictates the excitation forces and may serve as a design parameter.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 135, no 4, 041014- p.
National Category
Energy Engineering
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-133975DOI: 10.1115/1.4007599ISI: 000326021900014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84888066139OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-133975DiVA: diva2:664238
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20131114

Available from: 2013-11-14 Created: 2013-11-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Authority records BETA

Fridh, Jens

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Fridh, JensLaumert, BjörnFransson, Torsten
By organisation
Heat and Power Technology
In the same journal
Journal of turbomachinery
Energy Engineering

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 138 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf