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Prolonged physical inactivity leads to a drop in toe skin temperature during local cold stress
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7440-2171
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Basic Science and Biomedicine, Environmental Physiology.
2014 (English)In: Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism, ISSN 1715-5312, E-ISSN 1715-5320, Vol. 39, no 3, 369-374 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose was to examine the effects of a prolonged period of recumbency on the toe temperature responses during cold-water foot immersion. Ten healthy males underwent 35 days of horizontal bed rest. The right foot of the subjects was assigned as the experimental (EXP) foot. To prevent bed rest-induced vascular deconditioning in the left control foot (CON), a sub-atmospheric vascular pressure countermeasure regimen was applied on the left lower leg for 4 x 10 min every second day. On the first (BR-1) and the last (BR-35) day of the bed rest, subjects performed two 30 min foot immersion tests in 8 degrees C water, one with the EXP foot and the other with the CON foot. The tests were conducted in counter-balanced order and separated by at least a 15 min interval. At BR-35, the average skin temperature of the EXP foot was lower than at BR-1 (-0.8 degrees C; P = 0.05), a drop that was especially pronounced in the big toe (-1.6 degrees C; P = 0.05). In the CON foot, the average skin temperature decreased by 0.6 degrees C in BR-35, albeit the reduction was not statistically significant (P = 0.16). Moreover, the pressure countermeasure regimen ameliorated immersion-induced thermal discomfort for the CON foot (P = 0.05). Present findings suggest that severe physical inactivity exaggerates the drop in toe skin temperature during local cold stress, and thus might constitute a potential risk factor for local cold injury.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 39, no 3, 369-374 p.
Keyword [en]
bed rest, CIVD, cold vasoconstriction, cold injury, cold tolerance, inactivity
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-134618DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2013-0315ISI: 000331946300014Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84894050016OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-134618DiVA: diva2:667274
Note

QC 20140331

Available from: 2013-11-26 Created: 2013-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Keramidas, Michail E.

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