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Geometrically necessary dislocation density measurements associated with different angles of indentations
Columbia University. (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9509-2811
Columbia University. (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science)
Columbia University. (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science)
Columbia University. (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science)
2014 (English)In: International journal of plasticity, ISSN 0749-6419, E-ISSN 1879-2154, Vol. 54, 81-95 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experiments and numerical simulations of various angles of wedge indenters into face-centered cubic single crystal were performed under plane strain conditions. In the experiments, the included angles of indenters are chosen to be 60 degrees, 90 degrees and 120 degrees and they are indented into nickel single crystal into the < 00 (1) over bar > direction with its tip parallel to < 1 1 0 > direction, so that there are three effective in-plane slip systems on (1 1 0) plane. Indenters are applied 200 mu m in depth. The midsection of the specimens is exposed with a wire Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) and the in-plane lattice rotations of the region around the indented area are calculated from the crystallographic orientation maps obtained from electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurement. No matter which angles of indenters are applied, the rotation fields are very similar. There is a strong lattice rotation discontinuity on the line below the indenter tip. The magnitude of the lattice rotation ranges from -20 degrees to 20 degrees. Lower bounds on the Geometrically Necessary Dislocation (GND) densities are also calculated and plotted. The numerical simulations of the same experimental setup are performed. The simulation results of lattice rotation and slip rates are plotted and compared with the experimental result. There is high correlation between the experimental result and the numerical result.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 54, 81-95 p.
Keyword [en]
Electron backscatter diffraction, Geometrically necessary dislocation density, Indentation, Single crystal plasticity
National Category
Applied Mechanics Metallurgy and Metallic Materials
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-136245DOI: 10.1016/j.ijplas.2013.08.008ISI: 000331664900005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84892811951OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-136245DiVA: diva2:675631
Note

QC 20140617

Available from: 2013-12-04 Created: 2013-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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