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Exploring Sustainable Practices in Workplace Settings through Visualizing Electricity Consumption
School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC. KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Media Technology and Interaction Design, MID.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1451-4187
KTH, School of Industrial Engineering and Management (ITM), Machine Design (Dept.), Product and Service Design. School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Centres, KTH, School of Architecture and the Built Environment (ABE), Centres, Centre for Sustainable Communications, CESC, Green Leap.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-5621-7327
Denmark Design School.
Södertörns Högskola.
Show others and affiliations
2013 (English)In: ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, ISSN 1073-0516, E-ISSN 1557-7325, ISSN ISSN 1073-0516, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

People’s domestic habits are increasingly being targeted to reduce levels of CO2 emissions. Whereas domestic energy consumption has received a lot of attention with several reported studies on sustainable practices, there are very few studies on workplace practices. Nevertheless, these are considered as having much potential for reducing energy consumption. This paper presents the findings from two field studies where two different types of prototypes for visualizing energy use were designed, implemented and evaluated in different types of workplace settings – factories and offices. The studies used design probes to explore how visual feedback for electricity use was interpreted and acted upon by employees in work settings. A striking observation was that it is very difficult to get people to change to more pro-environmental behavior and practices in a workplace environment. The paper discusses why this might be the case.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: ACM Press, 2013. Vol. 20, no 5
Keyword [en]
Human factors, design, Pro-environmental HCI, sustainable practice, design interventions, ethnography, case studies, research through design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
SRA - ICT
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-137211DOI: 10.1145/2501526ISI: 000327432600005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84887846506OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-137211DiVA: diva2:678328
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20131212

Available from: 2013-12-11 Created: 2013-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Storyforming: Experiments in creating discursive engagements between people, things and environments
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Storyforming: Experiments in creating discursive engagements between people, things and environments
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis introduces and critically reflects on a design programme, Storyforming, that explores ways to design objects and places to enrich daily life narratives. Using an experimental design approach, the goal is to exemplify and explore this idea with discursive artefacts that, through their physical and temporal form, act as catalysts in the construction of meaningful experiences.

In the current sustainability discourse, behavioural change has been pointed out as a key factor in achieving a sustainable society. Historically, design has been very effective in increasing production and consumption behaviours by creating new types of needs and, in a way, manufacturing desire (Forty, 1986). Drawing on this, the overarching aim of this thesis is the investigation of the ways design, through a suggested programme, can afford alternative types of meaningful experiences in contrast to the prevailing consumer culture.

The empirical work reported in the thesis stems from several research projects looking into the matter of energy use in relation to design. In addition, two of the projects have been carried out in the author’s own design practice. Some concepts are explored more in-depth—involving events such as field studies, situated interviews, workshops, prototype building, design interventions in the form of domestication probes, and contextual studies ranging from a few weeks up to a year—while other concepts exist only as sketches or photo montages. The diversity of these concepts, the design experiments, helps span a design space becoming a new provisional design programme. The idea for this programme has evolved from observations and reflections made throughout the experiments presented in the thesis.

The general results are the suggested approach of Storyforming, which focuses on the design of artefacts supporting daily narratives that can be used to create engagement, meaning, and alternative values applicable to the discourse of sustainable behaviour.

Specific contributions are the selection of design experiments. In the thesis, the experiments have first been examined from the perspective of stories and forming as a basis for the new programme formulation. Through this articulation of the programme, the experiments are revisited through three leitmotifs, part of the provisional programme focusing on different properties related to the aspect of forming. From the perspective of the user, these themes—seeing and accessing designs, exploring and expressing complexity, and sharing experiences and negotiating use—are finally elaborated on in relation to other theoretical concepts as well as their implications for future research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. 287 p.
Series
TRITA-MMK, ISSN 1400-1179 ; 14:6
Keyword
interaction design, sustainable design, research through design, critical design
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Machine Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-148049 (URN)978-91-7595-212-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-09-03, Kollegiesalen, Brinellvägen 8, KTH, Stockholm, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency
Note

QC 20140825

Available from: 2014-08-25 Created: 2014-07-19 Last updated: 2017-07-04Bibliographically approved

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