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A social network integrated game experiment to relate tapping to speed perception and explore rhythm reproduction
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4957-2128
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Music Acoustics.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2926-6518
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the Sound and Music Computing Conference 2013, 2013, 19-26 p.Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

During recent years, games with a purpose (GWAPs) have become increasingly popular for studying human behaviour [1–4]. However, no standardised method for web-based game experiments has been proposed so far. We present here our approach comprising an extended version of the CaSimIR social game framework [5] for data collection, mini-games for tempo and rhythm tapping, and an initial analysis of the data collected so far. The game presented here is part of the Spot The Odd Song Out game, which is freely available for use on Facebook and on the Web 1 .We present the GWAP method in some detail and a preliminary analysis of data collected. We relate the tapping data to perceptual ratings obtained in previous work. The results suggest that the tapped tempo data collected in a GWAP can be used to predict perceived speed. I toned down the above statement as I understand from the results section that our data are not as good as When averagingthe rhythmic performances of a group of 10 players in the second experiment, the tapping frequency shows a pattern that corresponds to the time signature of the music played. Our experience shows that more effort in design and during runtime is required than in a traditional experiment. Our experiment is still running and available on line.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. 19-26 p.
National Category
Computer Science Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-137405ISBN: 978-3-8325-3472-1 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-137405DiVA: diva2:678902
Conference
The Sound and Music Computing Conference (SMC 2013); Stockholm, Sweden, July 30 - August 2, 2013
Note

QC 20140520

tmh_import_13_12_13, tmh_id_3879

Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2014-05-20Bibliographically approved

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Friberg, Anders

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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