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Co-present or Not?: Embodiment, Situatedness and the Mona Lisa Gaze Effect
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9327-9482
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.
KTH, School of Computer Science and Communication (CSC), Speech, Music and Hearing, TMH, Speech Communication and Technology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1399-6604
2013 (English)In: Eye gaze in intelligent user interfaces: gaze-based analyses, models and applications / [ed] Nakano, Yukiko; Conati, Cristina; Bader, Thomas, London: Springer London, 2013, 185-203 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The interest in embodying and situating computer programmes took off in the autonomous agents community in the 90s. Today, researchers and designers of programmes that interact with people on human terms endow their systems with humanoid physiognomies for a variety of reasons. In most cases, attempts at achieving this embodiment and situatedness has taken one of two directions: virtual characters and actual physical robots. In addition, a technique that is far from new is gaining ground rapidly: projection of animated faces on head-shaped 3D surfaces. In this chapter, we provide a history of this technique; an overview of its pros and cons; and an in-depth description of the cause and mechanics of the main drawback of 2D displays of 3D faces (and objects): the Mona Liza gaze effect. We conclude with a description of an experimental paradigm that measures perceived directionality in general and the Mona Lisa gaze effect in particular.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Springer London, 2013. 185-203 p.
National Category
Computer Science Language Technology (Computational Linguistics)
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-137382DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4471-4784-8_10ISBN: 978-1-4471-4783-1 (print)ISBN: 978-1-4471-4784-8 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-137382DiVA: diva2:678930
Note

tmh_import_13_12_13, tmh_id_3782

QC 20140219

Available from: 2013-12-13 Created: 2013-12-13 Last updated: 2014-02-19Bibliographically approved

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Edlund, JensBeskow, Jonas

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