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Getting up from the floor: Older peroples´ abilities and experiences
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
KTH, School of Technology and Health (STH), Centres, Centre for Health and Building, CHB.
(English)In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To analyse the movement patterns of people over 75 years of age when getting up from the floor, and to find out what they describe as critical moments in getting up.

Design: Observation of old people performing get up from floor and evaluation of experiences in VIDAR evaluation program.

Setting: Tests were made in a laboratory environment

Participants: 20 participants, eleven women and nine men. The mean age was 79 years.

Result: Most elderly persons in this case did experience difficulties in getting up. The difficulties were mainly described in legs and were related to discomfort, weakness and balance issues. Most of the participants 18 of 20 made the getting up by themselves. The most of the participants 18 of 20 preferred a getting up including a position kneeling. The most critical part in getting were lifting one leg forward and then stretch the legs after kneeling, 17 of 18 described difficulties in this part.

Conclusions: When developing aids to help persons to get up the main goal should be to reduce load on legs and support balance for the user. Training should include balance and muscle exercise of the leg.

Keyword [en]
Elderly, Getting up from floor, Falls, Mobilisation after fall, stand up, experience of getting up
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-140191OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-140191DiVA: diva2:688621
Note

QS 2014

Available from: 2014-01-17 Created: 2014-01-17 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Ergonomics at Home: Design for Safe Living and Home Care
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ergonomics at Home: Design for Safe Living and Home Care
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The home should represent safety and security for the person who lives there, and this is an important factor for independence and autonomy in very old age. With aging populations, the needs for long-term care increase, care provided by spouses and/or from the growing home care sector. Injuries among these groups are common.

In this study, an ergonomics perspective was applied in the analysis of some basic daily activities performed by old persons and by home care workers, assisting.

  • The postures and movements of home care staff assisting at toilet visits, and transferring persons from wheelchair to toilet, were measured and analysed.

  • Some daily activities related to making food and washing clothes, performed by a group of persons between the age of 75 and 100, were measured and analysed.

  • The task of getting up from the floor – on your own and with the help of a walker equipped with a lifting device – was analysed with the help of older persons and nursing staff. The design was built on the knowledge gained from analysing how older people get up from floor.

  • Requirements for access with a four-wheeled walker in the local built environment were investigated.

Observations were made with the help of video recording. Postures were recorded with the CUELA measurement system. The VIDAR ergonomics evaluation instrument was used to register the participants’ experiences of discomfort and pain during getting up from the floor with or without the walker with a lifting device. Structured interviews were used to find out about older peoples’ experience of using the four-wheel walker.

It is concluded that ageing at home requires improved architectural and technical bathroom design and improved access in the local built environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. 59 p.
Series
TRITA-STH : report, ISSN 1653-3836 ; 2014:1
Keyword
Ergonomics, aging, work posture, four-wheeled walker, home care worker, living at home, accessibility
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-140418 (URN)978-91-7501-991-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2014-02-14, KTH Skolan för Teknik och Hälsa sal 2105, Marinensväg 30, Haninge, 13:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20140124

Available from: 2014-01-24 Created: 2014-01-23 Last updated: 2014-01-24Bibliographically approved
2. The Adoption of Ergonomic Innovations for Injury Prevention: Examples from the building construction and health care industries
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Adoption of Ergonomic Innovations for Injury Prevention: Examples from the building construction and health care industries
2014 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A good work environment is important for the individual, for industry and for society. The work environment research has, predominantly, targeted identification of problems and the measurement of the size of these problems.

Innovations to reduce the incidence of musculoskeletal disorder, MSD, have been introduced in different branches of industry, but with limited success.

Few of the ergonomic innovations developed for the building and construction industry have reached a sufficient level of adoption. Ergonomic innovations in the health care sector are of an incremental character and seem to have similar problems of adoption as the ones in the building and construction industry.

Three examples of ergonomic innovation are examined in the thesis:

  • a glue spreader for floor layers

  • a four-wheel walker with a lifting device

  • a sonographer’s scanning support device

The studies show that an ergonomic innovation is not adopted for prevention of occupational injury unless the innovation also has other relative advantages apart from the ergonomic ones. For the group who already has sustained an injury, it is enough that the ergonomic problems are solved, while the other, symptom-free group, requires other advantages in order to adopt the innovation; increased production economy seems to be the most prominent potential advantage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: KTH Royal Institute of Technology, 2014. 44 p.
Series
TRITA-STH : report, ISSN 1653-3836 ; 2014:6
Keyword
Ergonomics, musculoskeletal disorders, ergonomic innovation, adoption, four-wheel walker, lifting device, sonographer support, floor laying
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Research subject
Technology and Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-158523 (URN)978-91-7595-417-2 (ISBN)
Public defence
2015-01-30, 7093, CHB, Marinens väg 30, Haninge, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Note

QC 20150114

Available from: 2015-01-14 Created: 2015-01-09 Last updated: 2015-02-02Bibliographically approved

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