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Enhancement of the finger cold-induced vasodilation response with exercise training
Jozef Stefan Institute, Slovenia; Jozef Stefan International Postgraduate School, Slovenia .ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7440-2171
2010 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 109, no 1, 133-140 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cold-induced vasodilatation (CIVD) is a cyclical increase in finger temperature that has been suggested to provide cryoprotective function during cold exposures. Physical fitness has been suggested as a potential factor that could affect CIVD response, possibly via central (increased cardiac output, decreased sympathetic nerve activity) and/or peripheral (increased microcirculation) cardiovascular and neural adaptations to exercise training. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of endurance exercise training on the CIVD response. Eighteen healthy males trained 1 h d(-1) on a cycle ergometer at 50% of peak power output, 5 days week(-1) for 4-weeks. Pre, Mid, Post, and 10 days after the cessation of training and on separate days, subjects performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion ((V) over dotO(2peak)); and a 30-min hand immersion in 8 degrees C water to examine their CIVD response. The exercise-training regimen significantly increased (V) over dotO(2peak) (Pre: 46.0 +/- 5.9, Mid: 52.5 +/- 5.7, Post: 52.1 +/- 6.2, After: 52.6 +/- 7.6 ml kg(-1) min-1; P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in average finger skin temperature (Pre: 11.9 +/- 2.4, After: 13.5 +/- 2.5 degrees C; P < 0.05), the number of waves (Pre: 1.1 +/- 1.0, After: 1.7 +/- 1.1; P < 0.001) and the thermal sensation (Pre: 1.7 +/- 0.9, After: 2.5 +/- 1.4; P < 0.001), after training. In conclusion, the aforementioned endurance exercise training significantly improved the finger CIVD response during cold-water hand immersion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 109, no 1, 133-140 p.
Keyword [en]
Aerobic capacity, CIVD, Cold injury, Cold-water immersion, Hand
National Category
Physiology Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:kth:diva-140535DOI: 10.1007/s00421-010-1374-1ISI: 000276606800017Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-77951094147OAI: oai:DiVA.org:kth-140535DiVA: diva2:690893
Note

QC 20150327

Available from: 2014-01-25 Created: 2014-01-25 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Keramidas, Michail E.

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